tenant not paying rent wont leave

TheBigShort

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If that property is sold and has 10 rent allowance and HAP tenants they WILL NOT get alternative accommodation and they WILL be made homeless.
:rolleyes:

Unless it was sold to a family of ten who were beforehand housed in emergency accommodation.

Again, the question was about the housing stock - its clear that the landlord exiting the market does not affect the housing stock.
But accepting your point about HAP tenants etc, then the solution is more housing held by non-property speculating landlords. An example might be that a buy-to-let mortgage is only attainable if the property is available to let for the full-term of the mortgage or even longer.
 

Sarenco

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BS

Others have already explained how an inappropriate regulatory and tax regime can result in increased vacancy rates, which, in turn, may result in disrepair and dereliction of existing housing stock.

As a matter of curiosity, where will your benign "non-speculative" (does that mean not for profit?) landlords secure capital to purchase or develop rental properties? Bear in mind that the State is severely constrained in terms of what it can borrow.
 

AlbacoreA

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There are large investors who are coming in and re-purposing large blocks of affordable rental stock into high end rental stock often for corporate use. Also the govt sold off a lot of its social housing for a variety of reasons not least to stabilise anti social activity.

Lazy strawman arguments aside. A rant against Landlords is ironic in a thread about overholding.
 

TheBigShort

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Others have already explained how an inappropriate regulatory and tax regime can result in increased vacancy rates, which, in turn, may result in disrepair and dereliction of existing housing stock.
Yes I agree, but it goes nowhere to explain the apparent mass exodus of landlords in the past three years.
A couple of points, 'vacancy rates' does not imply an exit from the market, merely a hoarding of property until the rental price demanded (to make it worthwhile ie for profit) is met. Prices demanded are not sustainable.
Secondly, it is this type of landlord, that should be pushed out of the sector. Buy to let property mortgages should only be allowable where the property is gauranteed to be let - a use it or lose it clause would be helpful, or a designation of the property as a permanent rental property (or say, 100yrs) would also help.
This would root out the wanna-be landlords who speculated that their 2nd home would provide their pension. Instead the professional landlord, the one who is prepared for 'the hassle' and engaged fully in the provision of long-term leases at affordable rates can emerge.
 

AlbacoreA

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Vacancy rates are not about explaining why landlords leave. Its pointing out how property might not be available to anyone. The property leaves the market and is not repurposed as you insist it will be.
 

AlbacoreA

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.... . Instead the professional landlord, the one who is prepared for 'the hassle' and engaged fully in the provision of long-term leases at affordable rates can emerge.
This idea of the professional landlord being interested in affordable rates, is mostly a complete fiction. Rather the opposite is true, that only unprofessional Landlords will maintain lower rates. Professional Landlords, usual larger companies will drive rates up and maximise profits.

In interviews foreign investment firms buying property seem baffled way some people think it works any other way.
 

TheBigShort

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Vacancy rates are not about explaining why landlords leave. Its pointing out how property might not be available to anyone. The property leaves the market and is not repurposed as you insist it will be.
Great, so we can agree that 50,000 landlords havent exited the market? Instead there is increased levels of property hoarding?

There's also a lot of vacant properties. I know a good few around me, and I know people who keep a house empty, using it rarely, or chasing unrealistic prices rather than renting it. Because they don't really want to sell, but renting its too much hassle. Some are just abandoned.
Yes, property hoarding would appear to be an issue. Any suggestions for long-term solutions?
 

AlbacoreA

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So you agree then that property has left the market.

If you want to discuss landlords not leaving the market then provide some links. Otherwise its just a rant...
 

Sarenco

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BS

What we are patiently trying to explain to you is that many properties that would otherwise be available to let are deliberately being left vacant due to our inappropriate regulatory and tax regime.

The solution? Change the regulatory and tax regime!

This thread is a good example of the difficulties that landlords face in dealing effectively with over holding tenants. There are many others on the inequitable and counterproductive nature of the RPZ regime, the voracious tax take on rental profits, etc.
 

galway_blow_in

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This idea of the professional landlord being interested in affordable rates, is mostly a complete fiction. Rather the opposite is true, that only unprofessional Landlords will maintain lower rates. Professional Landlords, usual larger companies will drive rates up and maximise profits.

In interviews foreign investment firms buying property seem baffled way some people think it works any other way.
professional large landlords can afford to finance the eviction of a deadbeat tenant where as a small landlord struggles to pay his mortgage for two years while trying to evict

industrial scale landlords are negative for rent prices and tenants
 

AlbacoreA

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Doesn't even have to be a troublesome client. They have the financial resources to take lots of properties off the market to "refurbish" them to re-sell them as suits themselves.
 

TheBigShort

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This was the comment I responded to

Close to 50,000 landlords have sold up in the last 3 years .
In my view, 'sold' means the transfer of the property from one individual, or entity, to another for an agreed price.

What we are patiently trying to explain to you is that many properties that would otherwise be available to let are deliberately being left vacant due to our inappropriate regulatory and tax regime.
So they havent been sold then? As I implied three pages ago

Where have you got the figure for 50,000 landlords selling up in last 3 yrs?

So you agree then that property has left the market.
If you define property hoarding as property having left the market then of course, yes. But I think you would agree that hoarding property is significantly different to selling property as was stated earlier.

What we are patiently trying to explain to you is that many properties that would otherwise be available to let are deliberately being left vacant due to our inappropriate regulatory and tax regime.
I appreciate your patience sarenco but its important that you also pay attention to what is said before.

The housing problem has nothing to do with shortage of landlords. It has to do with shortage of housing.
 

AlbacoreA

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If you are expecting housing to simply vanish you might be watching too much Harry Potter.

Any links to... Well anything...?
 

Firefly

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Hi OP. How about something radical like contacting the electricity provider and requesting that the bill be switched to your name. Then inform the tenant that the electricity and rent are to be paid together. Failure to do so and you will cut off the power to the house
 

AlbacoreA

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??? You want me to provide a link to a claim made by another poster, that I have asked to provide a source for????:confused:
That doesnt make sense.
You've said lots of things like landlords leaving not having an effect on housing stock. Or that housing never gets removed from use as housing. We given you loads examples. You have given none.

Do you have links to add credence to any of your theories.

If you are interested in how many landlords leave the market you can find it online. It will also tell you more join all the time. But more leave than enter at the moment.

So you could choose to provide some links and reports rather than arguing against strawman that you invent.
 
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