Wood burning stoves

raven

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214
Trying to decide between wood burning stove and muti fuel. Wood burning isn't something I had been seriously entertaining to be honest.
Aesthetically the wood burners do look well though, guess that's down to not having bulky grates and ash pans. It seems you really need to be using kiln dried wood in this country, is that a fair statement? ...seems expensive.

Wondering about storage as well. I'd need to get some kind of log store. Most I see have open fronts and slatted sides which seems the logs would get a proper soaking, seems a but mad for storing kiln dried wood? Am I missing something with this?
 

noproblem

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Lots of people use freshly cut timber in stoves and grates. It's absolutely futile explaining to them how stupid this is. You asked if it was a fair statement that you should use kiln dried timber, the answer is no (in a way). But should you use timber that has been seasoned over a few years and is dry? Yes
 

Leo

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Little point storing kiln dried wood outdoors, it's moisture content will rise over time so you're paying a premium to reduce moisture content only to allow it rise again. The slatted stores you see are used to air dry wood, a good one will keep the rain off, but allow air to flow through the stack. The equilibrium moisture content for Dublin ranges from 15-19% over the course of the year, that is the level wood stored outdoors but protected from the rain will move towards.
 

galwaypat

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211
Don't know about stoves there is a lot to be said for pushing a button. I made the mistake a few years back of putting in a large stove with a back boiler to heat 14 roads but what I wasn't told you need to be horsing in the fuel to it. There is a lot of work a lot of ashes and plenty of dust and you don't have the instant heat of oil.
 

galway_blow_in

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Don't know about stoves there is a lot to be said for pushing a button. I made the mistake a few years back of putting in a large stove with a back boiler to heat 14 roads but what I wasn't told you need to be horsing in the fuel to it. There is a lot of work a lot of ashes and plenty of dust and you don't have the instant heat of oil.
. What he said !
 

galway_blow_in

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We have two room stoves though rarely light the kitchen one, we have a turf plot which came with the house, if you have to buy fuel, go with wood stove
 

Palerider

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Rich people push a button, I like my stove which heats the rads, I cheat by using the gas to get the rads up to temp, the stove carries it along nicely from there, I only use the gas as a back up in very cold weather, yes the ashes are a pain, as is the cleaning etc but I like it, it's a lifestyle thing I guess.
 

MangoJoe

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101
Why not get a multifuel stove and burn what you like? Coal burns hottest and longest in my experience.

Also we have a large stove with back boiler which is hard work - You do need a lot of time and a lot of fuel to get a series of radiators any way hot. Often this means that the stove has to be worked hard to pass on this heat but who wants that room to be 45 degrees?

By far my favourite stove is my other one - A lovely little insert stove, 3/4 fill it with coal in the morning and it will run until midnight on the same fuelling with a nice even heat throughout.

Running stoves emphasises for me the amazing speed and efficiency of a modern condensing oil boiler for heating rads and water - A 3 way timer with weekday/weekend setting and boost buttons is the way to go.

The stoves are almost like an occasional change/hobby at this stage - I'd hate to have to be running them daily with soot up to my elbows and all the other dirty, annoying side effects they have.
 
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noproblem

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Hard to beat the oil/gas. Convenience and instant and far from being too dear. The only good thing about solid fuel is staring at the flames and thinking about everyone who's gone to la la land and there's too much of that in this country. Someone said "rich people push the button". What a load of nonsense.
 

raven

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214
Thanks for the replies.

The stove would be a secondary source of heat. House already has natural gas, and thinking of putting a stove ibto an existing fireplace/chimney in an open plan area.

Yeah, I'm not sure about suitability of our damp climate for wood burning stoves tbh. I'd be inclined to go multi fuel alright.one of my reasons as well is fuel flexibility and backup in case of power cuts or boiler break down etc, as well as comfort. Really seems to me that the added efficiency of a wood burner are offset by the inefficiencies of the damp Irish climate. Wood burner would be a no brainer in dryer european/Scandinavian climate where you have ample supply of quality wood.

Next thing then is insert or free standing!
 

Tippstar

New Member
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1
We have a very small wood burning stove in the fireplace of our smallish sitting room. My partner is a plumber and he insisted we get a stovax stove. Imo, It was very expensive... But its brilliant. It burns approx a log an hour or so, heats our cold room and the best thing is, that although we've used it almost every evening since september it has produced only half a bucket full of ashes! The only pain was filling an outhouse with logs for the stove.
 

raven

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214
I saw some Stovax and you could really tell the difference in quality, but they tend to focus more on wood burning as you go up the KW from what I can tell. I'd be looking for 10kw approx.

Anyone have any suggestions as to what would be regarded as a high quality brand for multi fuel at that kind of output (10kw)? Looking for something a bit contemporary looking also. Not wanting Rolls Royce but would be ok to pay a bit more for quality and peace of mind, "buy cheap buy twice" and all that.

Same with Morso as regards wood burning. How would Aarow compare?
 

Coldwarrior

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114
I got this installed a couple of years ago and very happy with it https://www.heatdesign.ie/product/vitae-9kw-cassette-stove/

Got the multi-fuel kit for flexibility but I just burn kiln dried wood and wood briquettes now, which give off great heat and don't need too much refuelling (and almost zero de-ashing). I tried coal and peat briquettes when I first got it and they worked great also, the coal definitely lasts longer and gives huge (too much) heat, but requires a lot more de-ashing and is more messy in general. The stove is 80% efficient either way so major difference compared to old open fire.
 

robe

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68
Hi i have two multi fuel stoves. A 8kw blacksmith , and a 9jw stanley ardmore in enamel. The stanley is a bettet looking stove and about twice the price. Both do pretty much the same job. I went multi fuel even tough i only burn wood ... options open and all. I would recommend both .
 

galway_blow_in

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I saw some Stovax and you could really tell the difference in quality, but they tend to focus more on wood burning as you go up the KW from what I can tell. I'd be looking for 10kw approx.

Anyone have any suggestions as to what would be regarded as a high quality brand for multi fuel at that kind of output (10kw)? Looking for something a bit contemporary looking also. Not wanting Rolls Royce but would be ok to pay a bit more for quality and peace of mind, "buy cheap buy twice" and all that.

Same with Morso as regards wood burning. How would Aarow compare?
Talk to Gordon heating in Galway, what they don't know about stoves wouldn't fill a matchbox.

We bought an Oisin insert off them last August, fantastic and unbeatable price wise compared to any other retailer

Had a Stanley prior to that, junk !
 

raven

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214
Thanks, was looking at heatdesign and they look very well indeed. Will look into this one more thank you.
 

raven

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214
I got this installed a couple of years ago and very happy with it https://www.heatdesign.ie/product/vitae-9kw-cassette-stove/

Got the multi-fuel kit for flexibility but I just burn kiln dried wood and wood briquettes now, which give off great heat and don't need too much refuelling (and almost zero de-ashing). I tried coal and peat briquettes when I first got it and they worked great also, the coal definitely lasts longer and gives huge (too much) heat, but requires a lot more de-ashing and is more messy in general. The stove is 80% efficient either way so major difference compared to old open fire.
Did that fit into a standard opening? Did you have to widen the opening etc?
 

MangoJoe

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101
Just to add something that might be worth considering in light of the Stovax recommendations.

I've no doubt that Stovax are an excellently engineered and finished product. I would however be of the opinion that they are very overpriced.

The favourite stove I mentioned earlier in the thread is actually a Dimplex Westcott and I think its truly excellent in every respect.

Its built like a little tank, nice robust easy to use dampers and handles, a good solid hinge and really heavy glass that's lasted very well. I also like the appearance and it gets a lot of compliments from visitors.

It will be installed 10 years soon and its been flawless throughout.

Price paid was €450 from a local installer - I later saw them in the Co-op Superstores for €399.

Thinking of it now I might buy a second one to have a spare in case they should happen to go off the market.....!
 

Coldwarrior

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114
Did that fit into a standard opening? Did you have to widen the opening etc?
Sorry I posted the wrong link earlier, I got the 6kw one, and it did fit into the existing opening. Not sure if the 9kw would fit without widening, I was getting a whole new fireplace anyway and also priced the 9kw, it was only an extra 100 quid all in. Glad I didn't go for the 9kw now as we'd melt with the heat, totally depends on room size & insulation levels though.
 
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