Why should I have to pay for someone else's high speed broadband?

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,154
I am living in a remote house with poor internet access! What is required to change to 3.5G darag?
Check your coverage from the various mobile providers, Vodafone for example, then look at the options they have available for USB stick, or other modems.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,154
No prob, one thing I forgot though, try get a trial period if you can. Many people report patchy or poor performance with these, so you'll need to be sure they work where you need it before committing to a 12+ month contract.
 

darag

Frequent Poster
Messages
472
Indeed Leo/Brendan, you need good coverage for 3/3.5g to work well.

Jim, I'm simply not convinced by the argument that it's always better for the government to something rather than nothing but I'd like to side-step an argument about ideology. But saying it is better to deliver something useful for the next 5 years does not seem relevant here; the plan, from what I understand it, would be to deliver by 2020. And even if were rolled-out overnight, I'd want to see the numbers on how many households were benefiting from an expenditure of 100m a year. Even if it 100k households got broadband who had previously no means whatsoever to access broadband, this would represent a subsidy of 1k euro a year to a somewhat arbitrary section of the population.

I was sceptical for a long time but I'm now of the belief that wireless will solve the problem on its own. I could actually buy the argument that the government should support ensuring there was proper universal mobile phone coverage in the country. This would have tangible benefits like helping in life-saving/emergency situations as well as allowing people to watch youtube videos. Proper 4G mobile will arrive in a few years and will blow current wireless out of the water.

jdwex, fibre probably seems future-proof but it has a serious flaw. I remember in the mid-early 90s confidently arguing we'd all have fibre to our desktops within a year or two. It never happened despite my conviction and cheap/low-tech cat5 twisted-pair ethernet became ubiquitous. That's because fibre was and still is expensive and relatively tricky to install and maintain. Installing and maintaining a 10/30km run of fibre buried under windy boreens just to connect an exchange to a single home just seems like madness to me. Criss-crossing cities and even suburban areas with it makes plenty of sense.
 
F

flowerman

Guest
Fibre needs to be spliced and this is a very time consuming and delicate operation.
Try doing it outdoors at junction boxes with gale force winds allmost blowing your outdoor tent away while you are standing in knee deep storm water hat has formed down in the base of the underground duct runs.Now also imagine trying to use a splicing machine and get each splice bang on perfect when out in those conditions.The fibre core itself also extremely brittle and even the slightest pressure on it and the actual bare fibre core will break it clean off.
 

SparkRite

Frequent Poster
Messages
1,151
Fibre needs to be spliced and this is a very time consuming and delicate operation.
Try doing it outdoors at junction boxes with gale force winds allmost blowing your outdoor tent away while you are standing in knee deep storm water hat has formed down in the base of the underground duct runs.Now also imagine trying to use a splicing machine and get each splice bang on perfect when out in those conditions.The fibre core itself also extremely brittle and even the slightest pressure on it and the actual bare fibre core will break it clean off.
And you're point being................?
 
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