split with boyfriend, house value = outstanding mortgage, he wont move out etc.

W

wealth

Guest
Hi

Just looking for some advice long story short split with ex boyfriend four months ago.

I have moved out of property and he is currently staying in house. I am making full mortgage payments as he is out of work at the minute. I have asked him to leave property so I could move back in as I cant afford both rent and mortgage, he is refusing

.I cant return to house while he is their as I dont feel safe. I have a six year old daughter who wants to go home, my ex is not the child's father, the house is currently valued at the outstanding mortgage. Property is on market for past year with no interest.

I have just received word back from bank that they will allowing me take mortgage over in my own name problem is he wont agree.

He is not in a position to take it over in his own name. I was advised by free legal aid that as I have a child even though my ex is not the father if it went to court I have a good case that the childs right's to home are more important.

Can he just be ordered from the home? I not sure.

I have applied for free legal aid just waiting for it to come through.

Be grateful for anyones thoughts or advice on matter thanks
 

Dezure

Registered User
Messages
18
If I understand correctly, the mortgage is a joint in both your names - but yet you are paying the full payments and he is living there and refusing to assign the mortgage to you. That doesn't sound very fair. If he is refusing to compromise you are going to have to threaten legal action and then follow through with it if you don't get a resolution by discussing it between yourselves.

He should either pay the mortgage and retain his right to live in the property or allow you to pay and submit to your terms which is for him to move out.
 
W

wealth

Guest
thanks for your response Dezure, yes mortgage is in joint names and we both on deeds, I am just really worried about going to court and the expense if I am not approved for legal aid, someone told me as he has an interest in the property whether he paying or not a judge will not ask him to leave. Dont know what to do as I can continue as I am.Just what this resolved. He wont agree to anything and house not selling, if it finally sells we will both be at loss.
 

PaddyBloggit

Frequent Poster
Messages
3,471
And you're paying full mortgage for him?

Time to take action ... either he contributes, or moves out or you stop paying and have the house sold.

Time to visit a solicitor me thinks!
 

Bronte

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13,825
.Just what this resolved. He wont agree to anything and house not selling, if it finally sells we will both be at loss.
Well if I was him why would I move. He's got the house to himself and you're paying for it.

Would it not be much simplier if you got the house sold rather than the mess of getting him evicted?

What are you afraid of exactly, is your ex violent?
 
W

wealth

Guest
thanks for your response, the house is not selling I am paying mortgage as I simply dont want my credit rating ruined, I want to start again and hopefully either get house back or buy new one, The house is not selling just wondering do I have any hope if it goes to court that a judge will order him to leave to house with nothing.dont want to take it to court if I have no hope of getting house. If no hope I will talk to mortgage company and tell them no other choice but to stop payments and suppose have to accept I will never get another mortgage or loan. My ex is very unstable at the moment I have a fear but he is not violent.
 

Petal

Frequent Poster
Messages
867
Have you talked to the bank? I don't know what the situation is if a mortgage is in two names. If you keep paying your half would the bank come after him for his half? Or maybe since the value of te house equals the outstanding mortgage, maybe you could give the house to the bank?
You could also try www.newbeginning.ie
I think they deal with house reposessions, but maybe they can help in your situation also.
http://www.newbeginning.ie/
 

alaskaonline

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Messages
489
You should meet with a solicitor or (if entitled) use the free legal aid.

There are a few things we don't know and a solicitor would be the best option to get the best advise.

I would presume just paying the mortgage alone doesn't neccessarily give you more rights on the house. If for example the two of you have a major loan in joined names additionally to the mortgage and he's the one paying the loan off while you pay the mortgage, you guys are pretty much on equal grounds here. But that's just me - again, get a solicitor to look into it!
 
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W

wealth

Guest
i am waiting for legal aid to be approved, as fair as I am aware full mortgage has to be paid or it will ruin my credit rating even if i pay my share it will still stand against me. But cant continue as I am with paying rent also. Just with paying mortgage and having a child thought I might have a better chance if it goes to court if a judge has to rule. Any advice on just if I do return house to bank what happens if I stop paying mortgage? Will my name be ruined for ever?
 
R

RIAD_BSC

Guest
I won't offer any legal advice, but from a practical point of view, maybe you should fight as dirty as he is doing..... It will be difficult and upsetting for you, I concede, but getting back your daughter's home must be of paramount concern. Others on AAM might disagree with my advice, as they are entitled to, but here's what I'd do for a start:

Have you still a key? Wait until he leaves the house to go somewhere (maybe you know his routine?) Then go in yourself and get the all the locks changed immediately (there are plenty of emergency locksmiths around).

Have a male friend/relative or two come with you for safety reasons. Maybe have your daughter go on a nice "holiday" for a few days to a friends house or her grandparents house, so she is not exposed to anything and so she isn't upset.

When he returns and starts banging the door down, call the guards. (Here's where you have to hold your nose from an ethics point of view - but then again, he's hardly playing fair himself, is he?)

Tell the guards when they arrive that you are afraid of him, that you are frightened for your daughter (both true) and that he pays nothing towards the house and you don't want him to come in because you've broken up. Make sure you have a male friend/relative with you in the house at all times during this.

I bet the guards will convince him to go away. Then you can think about getting a restraining order or something against him, because you have a record of having had to call the guards out, you're back in your home, and you seem genuinely afraid of the guy. If you have genuine grounds to think he is unstable, you could get a restraining order in a flash if you tell the court these grounds, plus the judge will consider the safety and stability of your daughter. The cost of a month's rent or two might cover the legal fees......

All of this sounds a very unpleasant tactic to use, and possibly underhand to some. But for the sake of my daughter's home, I'd do anything to get it back and get him out....... The guy sounds like trouble....

Hope it all works out for you.....
 

fizzelina

Frequent Poster
Messages
536
+1 to Riad's advice - it is spot on what that guy needs. You are paying the mortgage you need to get yourself back into the house and then wait there while the courts decide. Get those male friends on board and move yourself back in.
 

Brendan Burgess

Founder
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40,572
I really think you should take legal advice first before you do this. I would guess that threatening him with violence would not stand in your favour when this eventually gets in front of a judge.
 
W

wealth

Guest
thanks guys for all your advice got legal advice regarding changing locks advised under no circumstances should i do this as much as i would love to maybe i should be tougher and play him at his own game.He wont sit back though be worried he would put windows in. the most annoying thing is he was caught with someone else thats why we split up i am getting punished i cant go home. he locked all inside doors of house bar where he had my clothes dumped he didnt think i had keys thank god i did.it madness.
 
R

RIAD_BSC

Guest
At no stage did I, or would I, advise threatening him with violence Brendan! Where the hell did you get that idea from? That comment makes me sound like some sort of a thug, or an imbecile, or both. Please read my post properly before you make a criticism such as that.

I advised her to change the locks while he was out and to call the guards when he started banging the doors down upon his return. I suggested having someone with her at all times during this so that she remained safe - I'd have thought that was common sense. I meant that they could just be in the background, observing, and making sure he didn't harm her. Never once did I say she should threaten him with violence...! This post will be deleted if not edited immediately!

She can wait a year or maybe longer to get in front of a judge, with no guarantee she'll get back into her house... while all the while he lives there himself and drains her cash... while all the while she lives in some rented place somewhere and ends up broke, or defaulting, or in some other form of big big trouble while he lives it up at her expense.....

Or... she can take her daughter's home back the smart way, and involve the police and the law if he gets nasty about it.

Of course her lawyer would advise her not to do this - it's not a legal solution, it's pragmatic one designed solely to get her back into her home. But sometimes common sense trumps faith in the law for a problem such as this. There may very well be no clear cut, goody-two-shoes solution to a messy problem such as being locked out of your own home by a cheating boyfriend who makes a fool out of you and then charges you for the privellege.

I know what I'd do, but it is up to the OP, ultimately. She has to think of her daughter's immediate welfare, and not just sit back and hope the law will solve the problem for her.
 

Bronte

Frequent Poster
Messages
13,825
You absolutely should not do what Riad has proposed. Falsely accusing someone in order to get a restraining/barring order just gives women a bad name and puts the system into disrepute.

What do you want Wealth, do you want the house, do you want to end the problem.

Do not stop paying the mortgage, it's not a half mortgage each. You are both liable for the full amount but if one is not paying than the other will have to. In the event of a sale you will have contributed more and should be entitled to a higher share of the proceeds.

Is your ex able to pay but refuses to do so. If yes he is playing you and you've walked right into his hands by leaving the house. If you are not afraid of him then there is no reason you cannot move into the house without any of the messing in relation to evicting him. If it makes you feel better there is no reason you cannot bring a relative with you but you would really want to be sure that you and your ex are going to live in peace (despite what he has done) until the ownership of the house is sorted in court.

If you move in and don't pay the mortgage then it will take about 2 years before the bank can go after you to evict you and you will ruin your credit rating etc.

There are two sides to every story. Even though he cheated on you he must have a reason for you believing that he would break the windows if you try to evict him. What is that reason.

If you cannot live peaceable in the house (and who is to say you might cramp his style and he may leave if you're there) then you should of course not move in but go for an order to sell the house. There will always be another house and your home is wherever you and your child reside. A fact that many people overlook.
 

truthseeker

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,577
If you have genuine grounds to think he is unstable, you could get a restraining order in a flash if you tell the court these grounds...
Just from a practical viewpoint, its not that easy to get a restraining order - and rightly so or youd get all kinds of false accusations leading to restraining orders.

At most the OP could apply for a protection order, but unless there is a history of violence or reasons for her to be in fear a judge wouldnt even grant that. Just one visit from the guards because he is knocking on the door of his own house wouldnt cut it. Plus - its likely the guards will just insist its a civil matter, if he behaves in a reasonable way to them they could just tell the OP to let him into his own house.

However - RIAD_BSC - there is merit in some of your suggestions. The OP, seeing as its half her property, could move back in with as many friends as she can and make the living environment very unpleasant just by presence of herself and her friends. Or she could have the utilities disconnected - if they are in her name, and make the place unlivable. Or she could put it up for rent and parade a constant stream of potential renters through the house. There are a lot of ways to make a living environment unpleasant for someone without resorting to trying for restraining orders etc...

But realistically the safest bet here is to get to court and get ownership sorted out.
 

alaskaonline

Frequent Poster
Messages
489
I completely agree with Bronte and as OP had stated herself, she cannot legally go and change locks. It would certainly not benefit her when it goes to Court.

Additionally and as some have said, wealth you have a right to move back into your house. Why did you move out in the first place if (as you stated) there was no violent background? It is bitter but he has just as much rights to live in this house as you have regardless if he pays mortgage right now or not. The legalities on how to change the current circumstances (eg.names on the deeds, mortgage payments etc.) is something your solicitor should help with. Not the banks or the police can be of real help here. The bank just cares about getting money and aren't interested who gives it and the police doesn't get involved unless there is an assault case.
 
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RIAD_BSC

Guest
You absolutely should not do what Riad has proposed. Falsely accusing someone in order to get a restraining/barring order just gives women a bad name and puts the system into disrepute.
Again, I say to you what I said to Brendan. Read my post properly before you dismiss it. I never said she should falsely accuse him of anything.

The OP is clearly terrified of him, despite what you say. She says so herself, she said he is unstable, she said he might put the windows in if she changed the locks. "My ex is very unstable at the moment I have a fear". She says he has not been violent, but if she was so sure that would continue, why isn't she back there throwing him out of the house?

I advised her to lock him out and call the guards if he got nasty about it. If he gets nasty about it, then there is genuinely something to fear. In that case, a protective order, restraining order, whatever, may be appropriate..... and it doesn't have to be a false accusation.. She should not tell lies, and I never advised her to.

If this guy is such a Teddy Bear, why doesn't the OP just confront him? Probably because she is so afraid of him. Should she wait for a black eye from him before she does something about her fears? Or a black eye for her daughter? Or even just a barrage of verbal abuse? She is afraid of something.

And why should she roll over and let him live in the house while she pays for it, and pays for another place for her daughter, while he gives her the two fingers? The OP needs more than legal advice, she needs some common sense advice too....

To the OP, why, exactly, do you say he is unstable, and what exactly, are you afraid he will do?
 

fizzelina

Frequent Poster
Messages
536
Just from a practical viewpoint, its not that easy to get a restraining order - and rightly so or youd get all kinds of false accusations leading to restraining orders.
That may be the case for a restraining order.
At the moment my OH knows a guy who has had a Protection Order granted last week against him by a judge, despite NO history of arguments, never mind violence. He was in court with his solicitor to oppose it. The woman in question had an affair, has a new boyfriend, wants to separate from the husband and for him to move out. When he said he's not moving out she managed to easily get the protection order and 2 days later she rang the guards saying she is afraid (no argument even happening) but the order meant the guards came, arrested the guy and he spent a night in a cell!! The guards were very sympathetic, bought him his dinner and said their hands are tied they had to come arrest him since the order is in place. The guy's solicitor advised him not to go back to the house. The lady got her wish. I'm sorry but these protection orders are easy to get and I am still in shock at this guy's plight.
 
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