Sell property without estate agent?

LS400

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497
No Leo, Thats not good enough. What your saying there is Political Lingo. Make it so complicated, that it will make it unworkable.
If I am selling a €50k vehicle, with an engineers report of suitability, and the vehicle crashes due to worn/damaged brake pipes, which would be a noted under basic inspection, then the onus is on the Engineer for not being competent enough to see such an issue.

To start saying we would have to rewrite legislation for such matters is ludicrous. An Engineer wont ask me if this report is for me or a third party, as this will depend on the price of the report to cover extra insurance costs.
 

moneybox

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Last edited:

facetious

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Lots of engineers gaining from the current system, reprinting same reports over and over. Windows need replacing, damp in the chimney, more insulation for attic etc etc. Why on earth would you need different terms of reference for an ordinary house survey?

At least in UK they making an attempt to go in the right direction.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/house-prices/10864514/Failed-property-survey-Now-sellers-must-disclose-all.html
Because a terms of reference in the report would indicate exactly what was checked (surveyed). Otherwise, a surveyor might just not check some items and the reader of the survey will know what was checked.
 

Leo

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No Leo, Thats not good enough. What your saying there is Political Lingo. Make it so complicated, that it will make it unworkable.
What part of it do you think is political? I don't work in this field, so have no vested interest.

If I am selling a €50k vehicle, with an engineers report of suitability, and the vehicle crashes due to worn/damaged brake pipes, which would be a noted under basic inspection, then the onus is on the Engineer for not being competent enough to see such an issue.
You do know the person who buys the car has no entitlement to take any action based on a report the seller commissioned?
 

LS400

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497
The point I am making is, that the buyer has had a professional in his field, report on the safety of product for sale, to its suitability for purpose. The engineer is not being asked to confirm emissions out-put, or check wear on the engine cylinders. Thats a more in-dept report and would be up to the buyer to investigate at his own cost.
The bottom line remains the same, he has had the benefit of knowing he has less chance of buying a pig in a poke, for the want of a better word.

The political remark refers to the point of the Government making a mountains out of a mole hills, who cant seem to make a cup of tea without an expert committee forming.
 

T McGibney

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The point I am making is, that the buyer has had a professional in his field, report on the safety of product for sale, to its suitability for purpose. The engineer is not being asked to confirm emissions out-put, or check wear on the engine cylinders. Thats a more in-dept report and would be up to the buyer to investigate at his own cost.
The bottom line remains the same, he has had the benefit of knowing he has less chance of buying a pig in a poke, for the want of a better word.
What part of
Insurance costs alone would make it prohibitive to produce a report that would protect the interests
of unspecified third parties.
do you not understand?
 

LS400

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Your right, Its too complicated for us to sort out.
Lets leave it to other Countries to lead the way.

I can assure you, with a little cop-on, this could could be introduced in the near future without all the negatives.
 

Leo

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The point I am making is, that the buyer has had a professional in his field, report on the safety of product for sale, to its suitability for purpose. The engineer is not being asked to confirm emissions out-put, or check wear on the engine cylinders. Thats a more in-dept report and would be up to the buyer to investigate at his own cost.
But the same applies in this example, if the buyer didn't commission the report, they have no come back against the engineer if the car turns out to be a dud.

The political remark refers to the point of the Government making a mountains out of a mole hills, who cant seem to make a cup of tea without an expert committee forming.
I hear you, but I think the real issue preventing a simple fix is liability & insurance. I just don't know how you resolve that without professional services prices rocketing, or the content and scope of such reports being watered down to the point where they have no value.

For someone selling a house, a car, or whatever, and providing a report stating the condition of that item, how do they deal with the resulting personally liable if something goes wrong? I just think the current caveat emptor arrangement we have works better than everyone selling something having to line the pockets of the insurance companies or face potential financial ruin when it all goes wrong.
 

LS400

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497
Hi Leo

I think Im probably sounding off due to the cost on fees which I have paid out on, and felt were very avoidable had some basic property information been made available which rendered the sale null and void on a number of occasions this year.
I did, and do see your point though, its just frustrating that there is not a simpler way.
 

Leo

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A workable improvement might be putting the onus on the vendor to ensure the property was fully compliant ion terms of planning, and that they had full and clear title to the property before putting it on sale. The latter would have saved me a few thousand when buying my place!
 

Eddie Peters

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Last year I intended selling my house by private sale but it wasn't put on the market at that time. However I plan to sell this year - without an estate agent (and without an engineer's report). However I've been quoted solicitor fees of €2500 plus VAT @23% plus land registry fees, contracts, queries, searches etc. - which could cost in the region of €4K. Does anyone know if this is reasonable? I always expected the purchaser to pay a solicitor for most of the work.
Thanks.
 

noproblem

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What do you mean by you expect the purchaser to pay a solicitor for most of the work? He'll pay his solicitor to get title to your house and whatever other fees his solicitor has. He won't be paying any of your fees, believe me. You're the one trying to sell, just make sure YOU have everything in order inc certificate of compliance, etc, etc, etc. The advice you get on this forum will guide you but won't suffice if you need maps, planning certs, reports, BER Cert, bank clearance, and all the rest. There's a reason they're qualified as engineers and lawyers.
 

Eddie Peters

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I do realise that I will need to pay a solicitor for certificates of compliance, draft of sale, pre-contract enquiries, review of deeds, indemnity insurance to deal with purchasers bank and solicitor, certificate of title, BER cert, LPT compliance etc. (most of which I have on file). But as most of these checks have been relatively recently carried out - do you think that approx €4K is reasonable?
 

delfio

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I do realise that I will need to pay a solicitor for certificates of compliance, draft of sale, pre-contract enquiries, review of deeds, indemnity insurance to deal with purchasers bank and solicitor, certificate of title, BER cert, LPT compliance etc. (most of which I have on file). But as most of these checks have been relatively recently carried out - do you think that approx €4K is reasonable?
€4K for selling a house seems astronomical to me. If a person has the correct certification, planning, title, deeds and all the relevant certificates of discharge in place, why would a solicitor charge so much for selling? A person buying has an average cost of €2.5k, why is it nearly double for selling?
 

Logo

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€4K for selling a house seems astronomical to me.
I purchased a property 2014 and was quoted €1,500 but eventually paid solicitor €3,500 for the privilege. VAT was excluded to seal the deal. The final bill included professional fees, postage forms, stationery & petty outlay, mortgage considerations, stamp duty, land registry stamps etc. I suppose you live and learn.
 
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