Requirement fo B3 BER rating

tmcg

Registered User
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14
Hi,

Would anyone have an idea what is required for a house to obtain a B3 BER rating?

We recently purchased a house that has a B3 rating. We have found the house to be freezing. Average temperature is 12 degrees. When oil heating is switched on for 2 hours temperature rises to 14 degrees but drops significantly within an hour of heating goes off. There is oil fired central heating with fire in sitting room (no back boiler).

We inspected the attic and found large sections not insulated and where it is insulated, it's done to a minimum standard. The walls are part insulated but not fully.

We find it hard to believe that a house could have a B3 rating and not be properly insulated. We have contacted the SEAI but to date have received no reply.

Any information would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

Boyd

Frequent Poster
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1,526
BER rating depends on so many factors. Have a read of this thread on boards https://touch.boards.ie/thread/2057039957/2 and this thread on AAM https://www.askaboutmoney.com/threads/improving-upon-ber-rating.214377/
both of which indicate that even things like having CFL bulbs can adjust the rating!

I know it's frustrating that B3 is cold but it's your house now so I wouldn't dwell on the previous rating. However, I did see another poster mention the reports can sometimes be viewed here, if you have the number
The BER number is usually listed on Daft with the property.

I would concentrate on warming it up rather than chasing how it got a B3. Does the house have double glazing everywhere? Any idea how old the boiler is or when last serviced? Similar question about radiators, hot water cylinder etc. If you say insulation in minimal in attic, I'd be starting by replacing that. Are there any obvious draughts?

When we bought our house, we replaced all of the above items as well as adding external insulation to some section of house. All of that made a huge difference (E or F up to C3).
 

Jazz01

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744
tmcg - various factors impact the BER rating, as Boyd mentioned.

One of the things that can affect the "comfort" level is the house itself. Is it a detached house, it is exposed to the elements (top of hill, in rural area)? Is the house old / drafty etc. Are the seals around windows / doors etc in good order? Is the attic door sealed correctly? Is the fire an open fire or stove?
 

tmcg

Registered User
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14
Thanks for the replies. The house is somewhat exposed. It's a 14 year old house with boiler recently serviced. All windows double glazed. The fire is an open fire with an insert door. As you said Boyd we will need to concentrate on getting them house warm now. I assumed that a B3 rating would mean a warm house, obviously energy rating is the main factor.
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,650
As suggested above, try get a hold of the full BER report. That should clearly call out if issues such as patchy insulation were observed.

The BER ratings give an indication of what the likely heating requirements are, B3 would suggest between 125 and 150 kWh/m2/year.

It might also be worthwhile get a BER inspection carried out yourself to verify the rating you were told. The accompanying report will give you details of improvements that will improve the energy efficiency of your home.
 

gpjordanf1

Registered User
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12
Hi tmcg
My home is a B3 rating that I got about 10 years ago.
The work needed to achieve this was Pump the cavities, insulate the attic ( was insulated, but there must be 400-500mm now?), install a 'A' rated oil condensing Boiler, thermostatic rad valves.
And solar thermal tubes for hot water.
There were 2 open fires in the house, one has since been changed to a insert stove
I have got Climote heating controls since then also
Very comfortable house, temp rarely drops below 18 deg with daily use.
Hope this gives you an idea?
 

noproblem

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2,048
The homeowner already has a B3 rating and is querying why the house still feels cold. I can well understand their anger with the performance of the house when heat is on, etc , and are 100% correct in contacting the SSIA. Someone gave that house a B3 rating and need to back it up now,I certainly wouldn't let it go. Far too much of this absolute BER nonsense taking place
 

gpjordanf1

Registered User
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12
Yes agreed
I provided a comparison for them as to what a genuine B3 rating involves.
They asked what was involved in achieving a B3 rating in their opening query...
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,650
I provided a comparison for them as to what a genuine B3 rating involves.
There are so many variables considered in the BER calculation that comparing just a few aspects of two completely different houses doesn't really tell an accurate story. Especially when neither of you have The DEAP software manual assessors use to perform the calculation runs to 196 pages!
 

gpjordanf1

Registered User
Messages
12
There are so many variables considered in the BER calculation that comparing just a few aspects of two completely different houses doesn't really tell an accurate story. Especially when neither of you have The DEAP software manual assessors use to perform the calculation runs to 196 pages!
I do, I was a BER assessor for a few years.
I provided some basics in what's needed in most standard houses built within the last 20 odd years

Pumped cavities
Attic insulation
Solar thermal tubes for hot water
A rated condensing oil boiler
Thermostatic rad valves

Assumptions
Partial cavity insulation
Partial attic insulation
Standard double glazing
Standard regulation construction
Standard ventilation
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,650
I do, I was a BER assessor for a few years.
So you should know that you need to start with the basics like finding out the age, size and other most pertinent details first. Now you're adding more assumptions that weren't present in the first response.
 

dereko1969

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2,699
Ah come on, gpjordan is given their advice of what "can" help to make a house a B3. It's helpful to a degree in advance of all the details being provided.
The fact that there's no insulation in the roof means the BER is more than likely wrong or faked. I would doubt any house built 14 years ago would be anywhere near a B3 without having work of the type mentioned by gpjordan carried out.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,650
The fact that there's no insulation in the roof means the BER is more than likely wrong or faked.
Exactly, so that's what the OP needs to chase down and investigate. Focusing on a few elements won't tell you whether a house is B3 or D2.
 

Laughahalla

Frequent Poster
Messages
145
OP, was the house empty for a long time before you moved in?
When we moved into our house it had been vacant for six months before that. The house felt like it took a full month before it began to retain heat.
The house for the first month was freezing. The walls/floors of the house probably lost all retained heat when empty for so long.
 
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