Key Post Preparing financially and otherwise for the end of somebody's life

AndroidMan

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135
Had this discussion with my parents and it seems they have a more complicated situation than I thought. If they had both died, there would be a chance that I would not be aware of some of their assets.

Have gone through things with them in more detail now but am thinking the same for myself when my day comes, I should list out my assets and accounts.
This is what I listed out and I would like to get input from others:

Details of Credit Union accounts
Details of current accounts in both the UK and Ireland
Details of deposit accounts in UK and Ireland
Details of pensions from UK and Ireland
Details of regular income from insurance payouts
Savings bond / prize bond details
Location of passports, birth certs etc
Location of wills
Burial wishes
Location of house deeds
Details of any debts that are paid out on a regular basis
I will get my name put on all of their bills so that the utility company will discuss account details with me
Same with insurances
There is cash and jewellery in the house so I know where that is now hidden
Also dad as an ex carpenter had a fake floor on the shed where he stores his expensive tools - never knew this!

Not a nice discussion to have but pretty important.
 

Mrs Vimes

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1,090
For me, I would need some way to pass on passwords for email accounts, computers, etc, I think that writing down the passwords and storing them somewhere safe, but accessable to a trusted person would be necessary.

This may not be an issue if your parents are less techy.

Edit: took me 15 minutes to post that as I was sidetracked! Crossed with BB
 

jpd

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3,141
Write the passwords on a bit of paper and hid it in the fake floor :rolleyes:
 

Slim

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2,488
Very useful thread. I have been procrastinating on this for some time as my wife is clueless as to our online banking etc. Also, some accounts are in my sole name due to laziness when setting them up. Will now get to this. Thanks all.
 

horusd

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1,830
Brilliant discussion here. I got a "Think Ahead" form from the Irish Hospice Foundation. Main headers covered:

Key Info( in case of emergency). Meds, Dr(s) drugs etc.
Health insurance
Care Preferences'
Advanced Healthcare directive.
Emergency Summary form
Legal
Financial
When I die (body donation, funeral etc)

You can order the forms online for 4 Euro..

More info:


.
 

AlbacoreA

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4,003
The order you do stuff is important. The banks and other institutions will cut you off from access once they hear someone has passed.

Worth while having an emergency fund in an account thats shared with one of the children.

Also its worth getting peoples paperwork in order while they are still around. Trying to get accounts, and historical records, to do the accounts for the estate, is very difficult afterwards. If they aren't in order before hand. having accounts in Joint names is very useful as is household services as they won't won't talk to someone who isn't on the account.
 

noproblem

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3,292
Some people keep a "stash of cash" somewhere in the house, shed, or wherever. Important to know where it may be hidden, and i'd imagine it would be one of the last things someone would want to reveal. Each to their own, but how someone goes about this is important. From experience, TRUST is No 1.
 

homer911

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84
Consider setting up a mutual Enduring power of attorney between your parents, or between you and each of your parents. This can be helpful for a variety of reasons and is only effective when registered which requires communication to relevant parties to prevent abuse. For example if one parent was incapacitated and the other parent needed to sell the family home.
 

Pinoy adventure

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Some people keep a "stash of cash" somewhere in the house, shed, or wherever. Important to know where it may be hidden, and i'd imagine it would be one of the last things someone would want to reveal. Each to their own, but how someone goes about this is important. From experience, TRUST is No 1.

The trust thing can become a mine field if there is any memory issues.
 

Subtitle

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117
Knowing his illness was terminal, my partner opened a joint account and transferred all his incoming and outgoing transactions from his personal account to that account. We just considered it to be 'his' account until he passed. It made life so much easier for me afterwards until I was ready to close the account. Although I understand that not everyone would be comfortable with that.
 

AndroidMan

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135
Prepping my info today.. Adding in Paypal and Revolut accounts as they may get missed and nobody would ever know!
 

hazelgreen

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125
Think about a 'letter of wishes' which is not legally binding but very useful to guide your executor as to how to dispose of personal effects and preferences for funeral/send off.
 
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