Key Post Plumbing

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sueellen

Guest
Hi,

Can anyone recommend a plumber for installing showers?

Thanks.
 
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effortless

Guest
plumber

where are you based liz? and wht type of showers?
 
L

Liz

Guest
Plumber for installing showers

I am in Celbridge. I am thinking of a mixer shower (which does not have the usual white box). But before I purchase I would like to speak to a plumber who thoroughly knows his stuff.
 
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legend99

Guest
..

Just be aware that with a pumped shower you need the hot water available as the pup only pumps....not heat.
Be aware that if you just have the standard hot water cyliner with no special recovery in it, or you don't have one of those instand hot water heating systems that you will motor your way through your hot water dead fast and you'd better not have 4 people in the morning for showers....else someones going to be very cold!!
 
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Liz

Guest
"Constant hot water" shower

I would like a shower with constant hot water and a powerful jet. Any recommendations? And what shops should I check out?
 
C

collieb

Guest
Re: "Constant hot water" shower

Liz,

If you already have a manual mixer shower fed from the cylinder, then you shou could simply add a pump, usually in the hot press which would give greta pressure and use the hot water from cylinder. If you dont want to rely on cylinder hot water, then a pumped electric shower (such as triton T90)is yoour best bet, but pressure is not brilliant to be honest. If the shower has to heat the water, then the power will never be as good as when it only pumps the water. If your unsure, try dropping into a pumbing suppliers/showroom such as Heatmerchants who also own Tubs and tiles.
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

Sueellen
Moderator


Some useful general plumbing diy sites

B&Q - How to Library - Plumbing etc.
www.homebase.co.uk/howto/projects/index.html
www.diydata.com/diyindex/plumindex.htm

Savy
Frequent poster
Need a shower installed in Galway city area


Hi,
Can anyone advise as to whether I need an electrician, plumber or both to replace a Triton shower with another Triton shower(model T80si).

What price should I pay for the installation of the shower?

Can anyone recommend someone in Galway city?

Thanks
S

Sparky
Unregistered
Shower


Good electrician or good plumber. I'ld imagine €100 +/- ish, for a straight swop, priming, testing and sealing.

In Galway try 086 384 9864. I worked with him before. Clean work.

astrid
Plumber??


My ceiling is leaking just beneath the bathroom and I need a plumber to check it out. I live in dublin city centre - can anybody recommend an honest and reliable plumber who operates in the area?? help!

kli
Registered User
plumber


If you haven't found anyone yet you could try my plumber - Richard Daly - 087 7660714.

astrid
Unregistered User
plumber


Having some problems tracking down a plumber. If anybody has further guidance, it would be welcome!

PaulB
Unregistered User
Plumber


Hi Astrid
I know an excellent plumber who you could ring. His name is Colm and his number is 087-2628527. Hope this helps!

Blarney

astrid
Unregistered User
plumber


thanks!

mary
Unregistered User
cold water taps not working...???


hi,
there doesnt seem to be any water coming out of the cold water taps in my house. Also the toilet cisterns are not filling up with water and the toilets will not flush. There does not seem to be any problem with the hot water taps. Would anyone know what is causing this and how i can go about rectifying it?
Thanks a million
MAry

penang
Registered User
cold water taps not working


...sounds like an air lock.

Is the cold water at your kitchen sink working?

mary
Unregistered User
cold taps


yep the kitchen sink and the downstairs loo are fine...its just the toilet and cold taps upstairs....

Allen
Registered User
Re: cold taps


Have a look at the cold water tank in the attic. If it is empty perhaps the ball cock got stuck? If it is full something may have got blocked in the outlet pipe.

penang
Registered User
cold taps not working


OK you have an air lock. Basically a bubble of air is stopping the water from your storage tanks from reaching the taps and loos upstairs in your house. The downstairs ones use the mains thats why they are working.

I can usually unblock an air lock by attaching a piece of hose to the cold tap in the bathroom, turning it on and blowing into it but this is seriously hard work.

A far easier option is to connect the hot tap in the bathroom to the cold tap in the same sink and turning both on. The hot water will push the air bubble back into the storage tank and the cold water will flow again. Only one snag here is that if the loo cistern is empty the hot water may flow into this first. To stop this happening hold the valve in the cistern shut with your hand while the air lock is clearing.

It usually only takes a couple of minutes.
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

Trixie
Registered User
Insulation re plumbing noise from above?


I live in a ground floor end of terrace apartment with a duplex above me. There are 2 bulkheads (is that the term?) running down the walls of my living room in which are plumbing pipes for the residence above. It seems to be quite noisy and I'm wondering can I add insulation into these now? How much would it cost? Basically I can hear the water flowing down the pipes and can tell the difference between the washing machine, a toilet flushing etc and am guessing that there's no insulation around the pipes within the bulkhead. I bought 2nd hand and the apartments are about 2 years old. . .

glenamaddy
Registered User
Re: Insulation re plumbing noise from above?


use rockwooll

Trixie
Registered User
Rockwool


Is this something I have to get done professionally? Can I knock a hole in the wall and put it in myself? I presume not.

sueellen
Moderator
Leave wall alone!


Eh, definitely do not knock a hole in the wall yourself Wait for a few more replies. Heinbloed might have some further advice. Leave it for a day or so to see if anyone else has any greater knowledge.

heinbloed
plumbing noise


I am not sure what a bulk head is.Is it some sort of a box covering the two pipes?
If yes than I suppose they are made from plasterboard,probably the red type for fire safety,fire can spread from floor to floor via the pipes as well.So if it is plasterboard than just glue a second or third layer of plasterboard on it.A quick calculation:1 sheet of plaster board 12 mm 2.4m by 1.2m,"grey"quality-cheaper- for around €12,and a bag of glue(which is some sort of gypsum)for around €8.Plus a small bag of finisher9a finer sort of gypsum) and a strip of corner bead(a L-shaped piece of white plastic profile).Plus a roll of mesh tape to cover the joints.Material costs are about €30-€40 including new paint.
You need mass(weight) for sound insulation,loose and lightweight material (rock wool)is more for temperature insulation.
There are smaller pieces of plaster board available but to safe on the work of finishing it is easier to have as few joints as possible,however a good plaster board fixer wouldn't mind to do 2 or 4 short joints extra .
Since you have a large sheet of board make 2 layers of it,glue it dot like, NOT over the whole surface.Visit the homepage of "Gypsum Industries",they might have pictures and more details.

Trixie
Registered User
Heinbloed heaven


Yes - I'm calling the box covering the pipes a bulkhead, though I think that might only apply to things in ceiling, not really sure but you got my meaning.

Suellen - you were right, I wouldn't really knock a hole in the wall myself (at least not unsupervised!!) but I was just trying to figure out if this was an expensive job for the pros or if there was something I could do.

As you advised - I waited for Heinbloed's reply - am printing it out for weekend study and will get the da involved at this stage!!

laoise
Unregistered User
noisy pipes


Remove some of the plasterboard and check if the pipes are touching the wall, each other any other object etc. It may be that when they vibrate they knock against the wall. This kind of noise can travel and seem really load. May be possible to put some sort of insulation around or between the pipes and close up the "box" again ?

Falcon
Unregistered User
leak


I've been in my new house for a year now. At the weekend (on Saturday) I noticed a leak in the ceiling of the living room just underneath the bathroom sink. There was quite a large wet patch in one particular area and it was also slightly damp along the length of the room where the window is.

This has never happened before and on Sunday evening it had completely dried out despite using water, shower etc. as normal. In fact you can't notice a damp patch in the ceiling at all now.

I am currently installing an electric shower in the bathroom and the plumbing work involved emptying the tank in the attic. Would this have caused the problem and if so is it a once off. I have had the attic checked and there are no leaks there.

Any suggestions as to the source of the problem?

rainyday
Moderator
Re: leak


Is your shower base cracked?

Falcon
Unregistered User
leak


No and the shower has been used since.

Last night I also ran water in the bathroom both bath and sink and still no sign of the leak.

Falcon
Unregistered User
leak


I noticed that the water pressure from the cold tap in the bathroom is very bad and in the ensuite as well to a lesser extent. Everywhere else is fine.

The leak still has not reappeared yet.

Falcon
Unregistered User
leak


As the leak has not reappeared in the last week, should I get it checked out or just leave it and hope for the best.

sueellen
Moderator
Re: leak


Falcon,

IMHO any leaks/drop in pressure should be checked out as these problems have a habit of reappearing generally at the most awkward time i.e. when you are out or in the middle of the night. Nip the problem in the bud and get it checked out.

mo3art
Registered User
Re: leak


Could simply be that your "overflow" section of your sink or bath wasn't connected properly when the house was built.

Our overflows were hooked up, but never sealed so when the sink was full the water would mostly go down the overflow but some of it would go under the sink.

HTH

Monkey0804
Registered User
Water pressure


The water pressure in our house is awful. The taps in the house run at just above trickle when opened fully. The hose on outside tap used to have various strengths of sprays when attached to old house (turn up to spray down patio, turn down for sprinkling flowers) but now all we get is weak trickle in this house with it.

I know some of problem is internal fittings - bath has that telephone shower fitting whose tube is minute, so showerhead won't give more than drizzle at best of times. But overall the pressure is really bad.

Anyone know how to fix - or do I need to get a plumber?

Thanks.

legend99
Very frequent poster


are you off mains supply, as in not a well etc? if so, ring the council you are on and ask them to test your water pressure. At least if they tell you that at the point going in from the mains to yoru drive that the pressure is super dooper you know you have a leak somewhere after that point. if however the pressure going in is crap, i think they might have to sort out the mains because the leak is on their side.
Sometimes, if its an old house, the pipe going from the road under your driveway might be made of lead and might have corroded

Monkey0804
Registered User


We are on the mains, so I'll call the council. It never occurred to me that it might be a leak, so I'll get that checked out.

THanks very much.

water diviner
Unregistered User
water pressure


It could be a stop valve on the pipe from the mains to your house that's faulty or half shut and thus blocking the flow ??
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

househunter1
Registered User
Water pump in apartment


I'm wondering if anyone has hand any problems with water pumps in their apartment. Mine is extremely noisy (wakes you up at night) and when its on the water gushes out of the tap at high pressure as soon as you turn it, splattering the entire surrounding area.
I've been told you're not supposed to cover them as they can easily overheat. Is there some way of sound proofing them safely?

Jamie and his magic torch
Registered User
Re: Water pump in apartment


Hi Househunter1,

Water pumps are notoriously noisy and any plumber worth his salt will explain this if you are installing one however as you are have a water pump already installed you know this. The water pump works by using an electric motor to pump the water increasing the pressure. The is little point in sound insulating the water pump as the noise seems to travel down the pipes etc and it’s not effective. There is also a danger of it overheating and burning itself out. The solution that worked for me is to put the electric supply to the pump on a switch. This will allow you to effectively turn on and off your pump. So when you do not need the pump turn it off. Water will still flow sufficiently to let you go about your daily tasks like brushing teeth etc, running a washing machine but not at high pressure as using the pump would do. Then when you need the high pressure turn the pump on.

In the meantime ensure that there is a cushion of some sort under the pump to inhibit the noise travelling through the floor, carpet works well.

Jamie.

nogser
Frequent poster
Re: Water pump in apartment


Carpet underlay is good for laying under the pump. A soft or rubbery material will absorb some of the vibration of the device.

Nogser

househunter1
Registered User
Re: Water pump in apartment


Tried the rubber and underlay last night, but this thing is still registering on the richter scale.
It's a 'showermate', looks like a cheap model with no adjustment on it. I've been told the better ones have larger impellers and run more slowly, hence less noise. Does anyone know if there is actually a decent option out there?

Saving this I might put the circuit on a timer so it does'nt come on in the middle of the night, similar to what you suggest jamie
Cheers

PS Just checked out the price, this one costs €300 - expensive little buggers. better ones cost €500-600??


jdwexford
Registered User
water pump in apartment


This doesn't really bug me, but.. the other half is another story. When we so much as turn on a tap (or flush the toilrt in the middle of the night) the water pump springs into action. Can these things be adjusted to start only when the tank gets to half empty (or full, depending on your outlook!)

Tony M
Unregistered User
Re Water Pump


Hi JD

There should be a switch for the water pump that turns it on and off. It may be on the wall close to the pump rather than on the pump itself. I have a water pump which I only switch on when I'm having a shower. I don't need the extra power for taps, toilet etc.


Tony

ando
Registered User
Re: Re Water Pump


The water pump in my apartment powers all water - taps, toliet & shower. If it locks up or is switched off, I have no water. Not a great design. These pumps are a little fickle, so maybe ask a plumber - is there any info on who fitted it on the pump itself?

heinbloed
adjusting water pump


Yes,no difficult job(5 minutes) but you better get a plumber in.
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

SC
Unregistered User
plumbing


Hi there - we're about to move house, and will be installing a new kitchen in our new place. I was just wondering - how difficult is it to take our washing machine and dishwasher with us? And to install them in the new place? Or should we just try and sell them to the person who is moving into our home? We've never done any sort of plumbing before..

Kiddo
Unregistered User
plumbing


Its really easy to un-install washing machines & diswashers.
Just unplug them from the mains.
There will be 2 pipes going into the washing machine & one into the dishwasher. Turn the taps off and unscrew the connections.
There will be a hose sitting into the waste pipe...just take it out.

to install...just do everything in reverse

The only problem may be the drum of the washing machine during transit. The new machine we got was fairly well packed to protect the drum.

hope this helps..

zag
Administrator
Tap tools ?


I need to replace a tap at home and having tried to get a spanner around the relevant bits while upside down and squashed up against a wall I decided to go out and buy myself a 'tap tool' which is basically a spanner with the head rotated to make it easier to turn in the types of constricted spaces where tap fittings are normally found.

Problem : it is still too big to be turnable easily.

I reckon I could just about unscrew the bottom fitting from the fixed water feed, but I can't even begin to unscrew the bit that secures the tap fitting to the basin itself. It is right up against the basin (funnily enough) and there is zero scope for turning the thing once the head is engaged.

Silly old me assumed that one size would suit all (and the shop only had one size), but it looks like I need a mini one to fit in the mini-basin which we have in our downstairs loo.

Does anyone know any shops that might have a range of these things ? I got mine in one of the better 'we have it somewhere in here just wait a minute while I dig around' hardware shops in the city (Dublin, that is) but they only had one size.

z

glenamaddy
Registered User
Re: Tap tools ?


Look for adapataps or tap repair heads.

Its far easier than changing the whole tap.

sueellen
Moderator
Re: Tap tools ?


Hi Zag,

If you need to check out availability I've found Smallman's Plumbing to be helpful. You could give them a call.

MissRibena
Frequent poster
How much to plumb a dishwasher?


Hi all

I'm thinking of throwing away my fairy and getting a dishwasher (not very hippy of me granted haha). I know it would be handier to have it near the sink but on balance I've decided to go for the utility room. There is a washing machine down the far end of the utility room (it's about 18ft x 10ft) but in the spot where I want the dishwasher there are no utilities (water/waste) that I can see but it would be backing onto an external wall that has a downpipe v. close, i.e. centimeters away.

What would I expect to pay to have it fitted? The electrical shop would fit it for me if the utilities were there but alas ...

Thanks a mil
Rebecca

legend99
Very frequent poster


1. You must have the biggest house in the world if you have an 18X10 feet utility room!!!
2. You are mad not to keep the dishwasher near the sink. Bear in mind, you will, or should, very often need to rinse struff before it goes into the dishwasher. Disaster if you are miles from your sink!

efm1
Registered User
Re: ..Biggest House in the World


Miss Ribena,

To follow on from legend99's point re the size of you house in relation to the size of your utility, I calculate that your kitchen is apprx 54ft x 30ft wide (Assumption that utility is 1/3 the size of the kitchen). If we assume that your sink is under the window and that the utility room is opposite this window then you have at minimum a 60ft walk to the dishwasher.

It was not stated whether you are blessed with the pitter patter of tiny feet (be they child or cat like) but assuming that most of the population has one or the other (ie either a cat or a child) there is an over 75% probability that you will at some stage trip on either cat or child during the course of your marathon trek to the dishwasher from the kitchen - there is a further 50% chance that this will result in some form of serious injury to you or the cat / child (over 75% of all accidents happen in the home !!!), so you need to factor in the increasing cost of medical care in this country when thinking about your dishwasher !!!

See, I knew I could get this topic around to a discussion on money and VHI !!!

Seriously though I would agreed with legend99 and put the thing in the kitchen - much handier !

efm (sorry for waffling)

MissRibena
Frequent poster
Re: ..Biggest House in the World


Sorry guys, but I'm right on the utility room size - 10ft is the widest part, there are a couple of chunks out of that alright, but it is 10ft wide and it is 18ft long for the full length of the room. It is very big and very handy and consequently, I use it a lot (the kitchen/diner is about 26ft x 14ft too). I don't find anything that strange about it to be honest; I grew up in a house with a "back kitchen" and a dishwasher, 2 sisters and varying numbers of pets and nobody ever got hurt.

I understand that common practise is to have it under the sink (but then that's for people with utility rooms only 1/3 the size of their kitchens! haha) but I'm not prepared to do that for reasons that I have thought about carefully. In any case, the microwave, freezer, lots of my cookware and foodstuffs are kept in the utility room, so I'm in and out all the time. There's lots to be said about holding onto your unit space, keeping noisy stuff out of the kitchen/living room.

Anyway that's the utility room covered, what I want to know is what it would cost to have a dishwasher plumbed-in in these reasonably straight-forward circumstances? Any help there?

Thanks
Rebecca

legend99
Very frequent poster


You will be paying far far more for labour than materials.

If you have the washign machine out there, you could use that to supply water, you should also be able to use it to drain out water. Its just a case of running pipes between the two.

Were I you...I'd also see how much it would cost to fit a sink in the utility room. if its that big, a second sink out there would be fierce handy!

Once Bitten
Registered User
Biggest House in the World


M. Ribena,

With the outlet outside being close enough, I would guess a good plumber would be in and out in less than a day's work, and I'm not sure if he would need to involve anyone else. Let's assume he can/will do the plastering/cement tidy up around the outlet. That being the case, and depending on where you live, I would expect you'd be home and dry at 200-250 euro plus materials.


efm,

Sorry for being picky and slightly off topic, but 54ft x 30ft is nine times the size of 18ft x 10ft.

MissRibena
Frequent poster


Thanks legend. The sink out there was another one of my ideas too. Don't know why they didn't do it in the first place really.

The washing machine is out there alright but it's down the far end and I was hoping to keep things roughly as they are now; where the far end is laundry; washing machine, tumble dryer, ironing, shelving etc. The near end is larder/back kitchen; freezer, microwave, cook/bakeware, fruit and veg and (hopefully) dishwasher. Would be great to have a sink in the middle but there's a bloody big window there! The opposite bit in the middle off to the side (the 10ft bit) is where I keep the recycling.

If I knew a nice/decent plumber, I'd ask for his advice, but my experience of plumbers to date has not been reassuring (to say the least).

Thanks again
Rebecca

MissRibena
Frequent poster


Thanks OnceBitten. That's what I was looking for. I won't be completely clueless when I call them about it.
Rebecca
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

Ash
Registered User
Waste pipe blockage


Apologies for any indelicacy but been having a recurring problem with the waste pipe from the toilet getting blocked. It means having to get down and dirty and clear it manually from the access manhole about ten feet outside the house. Needless to say it is not the most pleasant experience.

Nothing which shouldn't be placed in the loo is put in. Just normal toilet paper used. There's no heavy people-traffic through the house either. But the pipes would be about forty years old. Could there be a build up on the inside, narrowing the capacity? Who would I contact to inspect the pipe?

Is there any product which might help dissolve any blockage, or prevent one from forming? I'm looking at a worst case scenario of digging up the pipe, something I want to avoid as it lies under a concrete patio.

Any help or advice of any kind on this unpleasant situation would be great.

stobear
Very frequent poster
Re: Waste pipe blockage


You may need a professional outfit with the extendable rods if the blockage is re-occuring, there are loads in the goldenpages. had this problem once, but initial clearing of the problem did the job permanently.

zag
Administrator
Re: Waste pipe blockage


It could also be a settlement problem. If one of the bits of pipe or junctions has settled a little this can cause a lip for 'stuff' to catch on and this could cause blockages to build up.

z

rogermure
Registered User


I've had this problem and it was as zag suggests the pipe had broken under where the footpath meets the road.
If you see local council guys fixing paths or raods in your area ask them if the could give you some advice or maybe they would know somebody who couls look at it or fix it for you.
If it is in a public area you may need lots of paperwork from the local council and insurance to open the road.
If you need all this done after talking to the road guys then your household insurance may have it covered mine didn't
 
S

sueellen

Guest
Some other posts

Chas
Registered User
UK Versus Irish Plumbing materials


Any plumbers on AAM? I've 2 questions ...

1. Is there any difference between UK and Irish copper and copper fittings? Can I use them here in Ireland and buy any fittings I need here?

2. A cousin of mine has been advised not to buy her shower in Northern Ireland but no reason given. Would there be any reason why an Electric shower(Triton) bought in Northern Ireland or UK shouldn't work OK here in Ireland?

Chas

legend99
Very frequent poster


Yea, be careful. I'm not a plumber, but i think a guy in suppliers one day remarked to me that the difficulty can be in the measurement of fittings. One might be metric, the other imperial, which leads to a very slight difference...which with something like mains water pressure might be the problem

glenamaddy
Registered User


Any plumbers on AAM? Yes

1. Is there any difference between UK and Irish copper and copper fittings? Can I use them here in Ireland and buy any fittings I need here?

UK pipe and fittings are slightly bigger than ours, ie irish fittings will not fit UK pipe.

2. A cousin of mine has been advised not to buy her shower in Northern Ireland but no reason given. Would there be any reason why an Electric shower(Triton) bought in Northern Ireland or UK shouldn't work OK here in Ireland?

No
 

Carpenter

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,607
Re: >>Plumbing

Glenamaddy
Irish plumbing pipe used in domestic installations is either 1/2" or 3/4", (other sizes used also) with compression fittings using (imperial) olives to match. Britain and most of Europe use metric sized pipe, therefore it is not easy to use fittings made for metric pipe on imperial sized pipe...But there is an important exception 1/2" pipe is very close in size to 15mm metric pipe. also 3/4" pipe is very close to 22mm metric pipe. By substituting imperial olives for the metric ones supplied with any metric fitting you can safely use metric fittings (joints, valves etc). This is done all the time and does not pose a problem. Imperial (or Irish as it is called) pipe will be around for a while yet. Thus you are right in saying that that Irish (imperial) fittings will not fit metric pipe, but metric fittings will fit Irish pipe., but only where 1/2" (15mm) and 3/4" (22mm) are concerned. Does this make sense??
 
Z

z102

Guest
Re: >>Plumbing

Absolutely , Carpenter , I did it as well the way you described it .But that is the secret of the plumber that he won't tell the " secret "......protecting his job in an otherwise competitive enviroment.
 

Carpenter

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,607
Re: >>Plumbing

Heinbloed

Perhaps protecting his secret, but I also think some plumbers do not actually know or appreciate these subtleties.............
 
G

Guest127

Guest
Re: >>Plumbing

i have a triton shower which i bough in newry 15 years ago and still working fine. i was told at the time that there was a difference in irish and british copper but all the plumbers around here ( dundalk) were able to use both as long as you told them in advance where you were buying the item. they all used irish copper but must have used one of Carpenters 'fixes' i have since purchased a kitchen sink in newry to replace one i bought in the south and which split when boiling water from spagetti was poured on it ( about 10 years old ). i had no problem changing it but then again both were british made. oddly enough it was the only one i could find with the exact same dimensions which saved me having to cut a bigger hole in the kitchen worktop. (think this disappointed mrs cu though as i think she quite fancied a new worktop.)
 

OhPinchy

Frequent Poster
Messages
388
Plumbing for kitchen appliances

Hi,

Overview of the below is:
How do I break out a single qualpex feed to connect it to 3 appliances?
How do I connect a ½ inch qualpex pipe to ½ inch copper pipe which has no threads on it?



I posted here a while back about an issue with a plumber and whether I should stick with him or go with a younger guy I know. Bottom line is I stayed with the original guy due to fact he was recommended by a friend who tried his best to make it work out, but its ended in disaster: I’ve found a total of 4 leaks so far and fixed those and the heating is still losing pressure. I’ve kicked out the original guy due to the fact that he launched into a tirade of abuse at me for disturbing him when, ironically, I was actually ringing to try give out about his work, but I’m now reluctant to ring the younger guy as he was annoyed I didn’t go with him.

I now need to fit my kitchen appliances (disher, washer, and sink) in our utility room and am pretty much left without a plumber. Plumber has left a mess of qualpex hot and cold feeds and waste pipes in the utility but it seems he does have a separate cold feed split off for each appliance, though it seems there is only one hot pipe which is running the length of the utility. I’m planning on splitting this out into the 3 appliances.

First up: I assume my dishwasher and washer come with the necessary pipes to connect to the hot and cold supplies (haven’t had a chance to look)?

I’ve found this qualpex guide here: http://www.qpl.ie/pdf/QualPLUMB_Install_Guide.pdf . I know nothing of plumbing but am a quick learner and based on whats in the guide I think I can manage to get the right parts and join up for the appliances. My question is do I need Appliance Valves or will an Equal Tee do the job (I’m guessing appliance valve has the female receptor for the male connection on the appliance pipes)?

Do I need to use PFTE tape when connecting the appliance pipes to the qualpex fittings?

I will need to connect the qualpex fittings to the copper pipes that feed into the taps for the sink. I think I’m ok with the fittings on the qualpex to qualpex side (extending feeds), but I’m not sure how to connect the ½ inch qualpex to the ½ inch copper pipes (internal size) as they have no threas. Do I need a thread cutter and a compression joint or a tektite joint?

Many thanks for the help cos I’d love to sort this one without having to get another plumber involved.
 

Carpenter

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,607
Re: Plumbing for kitchen appliances

I could reply to this but I'll have to wait 'til i finish work! There's a lot of questions there........
 

Carpenter

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,607
Re: Plumbing for kitchen appliances

Oh Pinchy
I hope to pen a response to your query later today- if that's any good to you?
 
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