Never paid Local Property Tax

Discussion in 'The Local Property Tax' started by Wexman72, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. Wexman72

    Wexman72 New Member

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    1
    Yes, I know we're bold people. But here's the story...

    My wife and I began building our home in 2013 and it was late 2014 when we moved in (around October). We'd only rented before, so we were never liable for Local Property Tax, and in all the goings-on as regards building and moving, etc. - not to mention how we just didn't know what the process was - we never did a thing nor heard anything about Local Property Tax.

    I know that ignorance of the law is no defence, but I guess that we just reckoned that sooner or later, we'd just hear something from the Council about it, and get a demand for payment. But it never happened and I understand now that you're actually supposed to register yourself.

    Has anyone got any experience or knowledge of a similar situation, so they might be able to give some advice on how 'understanding' a Council might be as regards paying off the arrears in instalments, for example?

    Thanks.
     
  2. gipimann

    gipimann Frequent Poster

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    4,677
  3. elcato

    elcato Moderator

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    2,782
    I'm pretty sure you are exempt as any property purchased in 2013 is. As yours only started existing that year I'd say you are in the clear. Anyone who is exempted is OK till 2019. Here's a link from citizens advice. I'd be surprised if you were not exempt that you did not get notice anyway as most people were notified back in the day.
     
  4. MrEarl

    MrEarl Frequent Poster

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    1,611
    Hello,

    I'd respectfully suggest that you pick up the phone and call the Revenue, explain the situation to them and ask them where you stand. To give a little credit where it's due, I've always found the Revenue to be approachable, helpful and efficient when I've needed to contact them. The fact that you are contacting them, rather than them coming after you, is important and will aid your cause, regardless of the ultimate potential liability (which may well prove to be zero).
     
    Clonback likes this.