Motor insurance: over 50's need not apply .....

Discussion in 'Insurance not covered in other forums' started by PinkLloyd, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. PinkLloyd

    PinkLloyd Registered User

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    I just found out to my horror that at least one major Irish motor insurer will not insure anyone over 50 who has not previously held an Irish driving license. This is not an uncommon case where an Irish emigrant wishes to return home, having been driving fully licensed and accident free for decades in another (non-EU) country.

    Surely this can't be legal?
     
  2. Ravima

    Ravima Frequent Poster

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    You say that at least one major insurer. How many have you approached? How 'major' is 'major'? Can you name them?

    insurers have different requirements at different times. Some will not actively seek young drivers, others cars older than 15 yrs.

    Shop around.
     
  3. Nordkapp

    Nordkapp Frequent Poster

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  4. peteb

    peteb Frequent Poster

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    So what you are saying is that he effectively has a provisional driving licence and no useful driving experience for Ireland. So he'll be considered a novice driver and charged accordingly.

    Nothing unequal about it Nordkapp.
     
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  5. PinkLloyd

    PinkLloyd Registered User

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    The bizarre part of it is that the person in question can hire a car here and drive around to their heart's content as a "tourist". The Irish system is simply not able to cope with the concept of an ex-pat returning home; this is not the only example, but it is one that I thought particularly mean. Can insurance companies discriminate at will then? What's next, getting refused because of nose-length, or hair colour? Are blondes worse drivers? Where does it stop?
     
  6. peteb

    peteb Frequent Poster

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    Again he isn't getting refused because he's a tourist. He is getting refused because he has a provision licence and no proveable driving experience.

    Hire companies are different. They self insure using captive insurance companies so they can do what they please. Its how they make their money.
     
  7. PinkLloyd

    PinkLloyd Registered User

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    My naive way of looking at it is either he's a risk, or he's not. The only reason he has a learner permit is because the state doesn't recognise his foreign license, yet permits him to drive for 12 months using it; however, he can't become a named driver on my policy because my insurance company is refusing to insure anyone over 50 who hasn't previously held an Irish license. No proof of driving experience was requested (and it is available). I in turn can't afford to risk changing my insurance company because of the various loyalty discounts, no-claims bonuses, and other lock-ins; so much for shopping around.

    This person's only option is to pay about €350 for unnecessary (but mandatory) driving lessons, then face probably €2500-€3500 for a year's insurance (yes, we asked). Actually, there is another option: get back on the plane.

    One need not wonder why we can't attract the diaspora home.
     
  8. Leo

    Leo Moderator

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    I'm not aware of any insurer in Ireland offering loyalty discounts so great that shopping around will not yield a similar or better quote. Unless of course you have had a claim in the last few years and you're 'benefiting' from a NCB protection that isn't recognised by other insurers.
     
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  9. Monbretia

    Monbretia Frequent Poster

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    Actually Axa last year had something called a 'renewal discount' on my brother's renewal. I was dealing with it for him and queried it as I had got my renewal a month earlier with no renewal discount, they waffled on that it was basically a loyalty discount for being with them so long. When I pointed out I was with them longer they had no real answer other than some get it some don't!
     
  10. PinkLloyd

    PinkLloyd Registered User

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    There's also a discount for having your house policy with them, and one for having your spouse as a named driver (even if your spouse doesn't drive and doesn't have a license -- crazy, but true!). If you have a family member with a learner permit as a named driver, they they get a discount if they do their mandatory lessons with a certain driving school and subsequently do an advanced test with the same driving school subsequent to passing the test.

    So not so simple .... in a nutshell, stitched up!
     
  11. RedOnion

    RedOnion Frequent Poster

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    OP, I'm assuming your policy is with Aviva? You will get loyalty discount from other insurers, but their learner driver package appears to be the best value available by far.

    Legally you can drive in an international licence for 12 months after you come to Ireland (with some exceptions). That's enough to time to get an Irish driving license (you skip the 6 months waiting list, but must complete the mandatory driver training).

    I understand that there are other options to cover insurance for that first year, including getting international driver cover. It's not cheap, and the excess is huge. There are specialist brokers that arrange this.

    I've friends who have had to pay over 3k for their first years insurance because their international driving experience wasn't recognised here. No option to be named on someone else's policy. From talking to some of them, Liberty seems to be the most popular choice.
     
  12. PinkLloyd

    PinkLloyd Registered User

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    Thanks for the tips, RedOnion, I'll pass on the information. Your experience does confirm that this is not an isolated case though. The international license works for 12 months but you can't drive if you can't afford the insurance and can't get named on a policy.