Mercedes - Back wheel drive

Gorteen

Frequent Poster
Messages
51
I'm thinking of buying a Mercedes but it will mean moving from front wheel drive to back wheel drive. Is BWD as tricky on snow and ice as some people tell me?
 

Clonback

Frequent Poster
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333
I have driven Jags and Mercedes and they are very poor in ice and snow.However that only happens every few years.Lexus has a nice ES model which is front wheel driven and its also a hybrid.
 

EmmDee

Registered User
Messages
288
I've driven one for a decade. The times the snow and ice have come down I've just left it outside the house. Better off in our small run around.

Problem is two fold... Rear wheel drive slips a huge amount (pushing on ice rather than pulling) and also the weight. I found it tended to slide back into the kerb the whole time. And any incline was a problem

But the other 99.99% of the time...
 

Drakon

Frequent Poster
Messages
435
Is BWD as tricky on snow and ice as some people tell me?
No, it’s not.

Where do you live?
Snow and ice are rarely an issue for Irish drivers, and most urban environments have the roads gritted/salted when snow and ice occur.
During “the big freeze” of 2010 or whatever year it was I drove to work one of those days, a 1994 merc. I was going out after work (Clonskeagh) and was leaving the car in the car park overnight. I left a couple of bags of horticultural sand and a spade in the boot so that I’d be able to get out the following day. Didn’t use the sand but it’s extra 40kg or so increased the traction sufficiently!

Many drivers on the continent have summer tyres and winter tyres, and importantly, somewhere to store them. They’re probably necessary here only three or four days a year.
 
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kceire

Frequent Poster
Messages
413
FWD or RWD, ive driven them all in the snow. Type R Hondas, BMW 535, 530, 525, Merc C180, S320...……..and the rest
Ive seen drivers make a mess in their FWD and RWD.

You will never take the car to the limits that you as a normal joe will notice the difference.
Drive appropriately for the conditions.
 

Jazz01

Frequent Poster
Messages
744
I've have a Mercedes for the last few years and so far no issues in relation to snow / ice. In those years, don't think we had a "big freeze" though.
It's your driving style that makes the big difference and if you don't need to drive in icy conditions, then don't.

As for mercedes themselves - best of luck with the purchase. I don't think I'll change from Mercs for my next car - pleasure to drive! But be aware, they can, actually I should say, will, cost more for maintaining - but well worth it :).
 

Blackrock1

Frequent Poster
Messages
509
No, it’s not.

Where do you live?
Snow and ice are rarely an issue for Irish drivers, and most urban environments have the roads gritted/salted when snow and ice occur.
During “the big freeze” of 2010 or whatever year it was I drove to work one of those days, a 1994 merc. I was going out after work (Clonskeagh) and was leaving the car in the car park overnight. I left a couple of bags of horticultural sand and a spade in the boot so that I’d be able to get out the following day. Didn’t use the sand but it’s extra 40kg or so increased the traction sufficiently!

Many drivers on the continent have summer tyres and winter tyres, and importantly, somewhere to store them. They’re probably necessary here only three or four days a year.
winter tyres are far more effecive than bags of sand to be fair.
 

meepman

Frequent Poster
Messages
73
It's the tyres that achieve the traction. As others have said on mainland europe most fit winter tyres and put the summer ones in storage. I remember a story years ago about a british top spec range rover not being able to climb a small incline in the snow, in france. At the same time a little old french lady flew past in her old citroen.
Guess what, she had winter tyres fitted.
 
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