Lender wants to pay redress to my ex on an old mortgage but I want no contact at all with my ex.

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bluefoam

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The lender has contacted me to let me know that they owe money on an old mortgage, due to the tracker redress...

The property was purchased by myself and my now ex-girlfriend. She subsequently (in theory) bought me out of the property & we split up. She now (I believe) has a new mortgage on said property.

So, they sent me documents to fill out to claim my funds, but they have returned the forms to me & want me to arrange to have her sign them... As far as I am concerned, it is not my responsibility & when I told them that they said hire a solicitor to get her to sign... I have no contact with her & want no contact with her either personally or through a solicitor.

The lender has now sent a letter, telling me that it is my responsibility to get her to sign the document... As far as I'm concerned, it's their mess & they should fix it... not my obligation to fix their problems or to re-enter the hell of that relationship, considering it was their financial mess that contributed to ending our relationship.

Anyone have advice on how to manage the lender in this scenario? I'm reluctant to work up big bills with a solicitor right now either.
 

cremeegg

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Has the bank written to her as well. If she bought you out of the property why would you be getting a refund ?
 

bluefoam

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I don't believe they have contacted her. The original mortgage account reverted to me only, as it was my personal account before the original mortgage was taken out, so I believe that is why they were in contact with me.

All money owed relates to the mortgage prior to her taking full ownership of the property... Which constitutes a new/seperate mortgage.
 
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Muddle2018

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Going through similar, I have been posting about the frustration of it since early this year. All I will say is that I regret giving the bank my exes details and not just signing the forms on his behalf myself as I am being put through the ringer for money that has nothing to do with him and not owed to him but I have had to employ a solicitor as the banks are not helping in the least.
 

Brendan Burgess

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Bluefoam

The lender wants to pay money to their customer.

You can spite your ex if you wish to by not signing these forms.

Alternatively, you can sign the forms and post them to her and let her deal with them.

But, if you don't want to do anything, you don't need to. It is not as if you had a loan on which they were demanding payment.

You can do nothing or you could just send the forms back renouncing your right to redress.

Or you could sign them and post them to your ex. She would get the redress and that would be the end of it.

Brendan
 

Brendan Burgess

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Muddle

Your case seems to be different in that you and your ex both seem to be on the deeds and the mortgage.
Anyone taken an ex to court over redress?

I gather from Muddle that his name is no longer on the deeds or the mortgage. He has nothing to gain or lose by not signing these, unless he wants to act the blaggard and demand that his ex splits the redress with him.


Brendan
 

bluefoam

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It's more simple than this. I have signed the forms and returned them... The lender should just send them to her to finalise their side. I'm not spite'ing her, she can have her fair share. But I shouldn't be forced into an awkward and difficult situation because the lender doesn't want to send her the forms.
 

bluefoam

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Bluefoam

just send the forms back renouncing your right to redress.

Or you could sign them and post them to your ex. She would get the redress and that would be the end of it.

Brendan
Eh... Why would I give up my right to the redress? The moneys owed relate to the previous mortage, which I payed and in theory we shared 50/50. Therefore we would both be owed 50% of the sum. Whatever mortgage she has now has nothing to do with the money owed. Seems you are jumping to incorrect assumptions.
 

Brendan Burgess

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I misunderstood your post.

You apparently wanted nothing to do with her or the refund.

Now I see you want the money but don't want anything to do with your ex.

I think that the bank should just give the money to charity if you are not going to get the forms signed.

They are a bank, not relationship counsellors.

Brendan
 

Blackrock1

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choice appears to be you send her the forms, you both get some money, you dont and both of you get nothing,

thats about it
 

Páid

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I misunderstood your post.

You apparently wanted nothing to do with her or the refund.

Now I see you want the money but don't want anything to do with your ex.

I think that the bank should just give the money to charity if you are not going to get the forms signed.

They are a bank, not relationship counsellors.

Brendan
Is it not good practice to send the forms to both parties separately? Otherwise, how are the bank to know that the first party didn't forge the other party's signature?
 

bluefoam

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You know, this woman spent two years trying to coerce me into suicide & I came very close to doing it. The comments here are judgemental, short sighted and as far as I am concerned are completely out of order. My reasons for not wanting to engage with her are real so Moderators, please lock this thread, it has gone too far. I just wanted some simple advice.

For the moderator to change my thread title is out of order.
 

Blackrock1

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Thanks, can you please send me her primary address... BTW, don't be so snarky and judgemental.
not being snarky and judgemental, stop being some sensitive.

as for the address i dont have it, but apparently you lived there so you should have it ?
 
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