Help with tenancy 8 years

p walsh

Registered User
Messages
15
Hi, I am a landlord and have had tenants for 8 years in an apartment in Dublin. We sign a 1 year lease every August. When the term ends in August, can I just take the keys and terminate the tenancy when the lease is up. Or do I have to give them notice?

Many thanks
 

Mrs Vimes

Frequent Poster
Messages
934
You'll have to give them notice of 224 days, so they won't have to leave until 25 October if you give them notice today. You can only give notice if you need the property for yourself or your family member or if you intend to do major building work or sell it. Otherwise they can stay on for another (I think) 2 years until the end of their second Part IV cycle (4 years plus 6 years).

Check RTB website and make sure you follow the process exactly. If they decide to move out sooner you can agree that between you. In fact if they decide to move out today without even telling you there's very little you can do about it but if you don't follow the procedure properly they could get a massive compensation payment from you.

It is surprising that someone has been running a business for 8 years with apparently little knowledge of the laws that surround it.
 

Vanessa

Frequent Poster
Messages
211
Check out the PRTB guidelines re giving notice. An awful lot of landlords will be amazed at the level of notice to be given particularly if the tenancy is a few years old. Of course the tenant can just throw the keys in the letterbox after not paying the rent for months and nothing will happen to them.
 

noproblem

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,144
You'll have to give them notice of 224 days, so they won't have to leave until 25 October if you give them notice today. You can only give notice if you need the property for yourself or your family member or if you intend to do major building work or sell it. Otherwise they can stay on for another (I think) 2 years until the end of their second Part IV cycle (4 years plus 6 years).

Check RTB website and make sure you follow the process exactly. If they decide to move out sooner you can agree that between you. In fact if they decide to move out today without even telling you there's very little you can do about it but if you don't follow the procedure properly they could get a massive compensation payment from you.

It is surprising that someone has been running a business for 8 years with apparently little knowledge of the laws that surround it.
The person asked a question and is quite entitled to do so. Like everyone I know, he knows a certain amount but not everything, unlike your good self.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

Frequent Poster
Messages
1,175
Check out the PRTB guidelines re giving notice. An awful lot of landlords will be amazed at the level of notice to be given particularly if the tenancy is a few years old.
Did the RTB ever write to landlords informing them of this change?
 

fidelcastro

Frequent Poster
Messages
78
Check out the PRTB guidelines re giving notice. An awful lot of landlords will be amazed at the level of notice to be given particularly if the tenancy is a few years old. Of course the tenant can just throw the keys in the letterbox after not paying the rent for months and nothing will happen to them.
Yes, they can. And is it any wonder based on the sentiments of this forum. If being a landlord is too onerous, sell up and see if you can make same profit elsewhere.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

Frequent Poster
Messages
1,175
Why?. Do you expect Renenue to inform you of every change to tax legislation. Its your responsibility to comply with the laws of the State.
It's a legislative change that alters the terms of a private contract between two parties.

The RTB has the name and address of every landlord that has ever registered with them.
 

AlbacoreA

Frequent Poster
Messages
3,382
Yes, they can. And is it any wonder based on the sentiments of this forum. ...
Tenants shafting landlords is paid for by the next Tenant. The Landlord will look for a bigger margin to cover the risk and costs as a result.

Likewise if you encourage Landlords out of the market, especially those struggling. It will reduce supply and supply of cheaper places. Exacerbating supply shortages especially at the lower end and increasing average rents.

They keep changing the legislation and it's not exactly in plain English. There were recent changes in relation to ending tenancies at end of term if not renewing and what reasons could be given and what happens if it ends up being available to rent again.

I wonder what happens now if the tenancy is terminated but the Landlord can't sell in the current market. Do the same time constraints still apply?
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,815
It is surprising that someone has been running a business for 8 years with apparently little knowledge of the laws that surround it.
If everyone knew everything about all the business they transact, forums such as AAM wouldn't exist.
 

Mrs Vimes

Frequent Poster
Messages
934
Very true Leo.

@p walsh Having reread my final comment it is a lot snippier than was intended, I apologise if it upset you in any way and hope it doesn't scare you off asking advice here.

Sybil.
 
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JMJR

Registered User
Messages
14
Tenants shafting landlords is paid for by the next Tenant. The Landlord will look for a bigger margin to cover the risk and costs as a result.

Likewise if you encourage Landlords out of the market, especially those struggling. It will reduce supply and supply of cheaper places. Exacerbating supply shortages especially at the lower end and increasing average rents.

They keep changing the legislation and it's not exactly in plain English. There were recent changes in relation to ending tenancies at end of term if not renewing and what reasons could be given and what happens if it ends up being available to rent again.

I wonder what happens now if the tenancy is terminated but the Landlord can't sell in the current market. Do the same time constraints still apply?
I am with Mrs Vimes on this - If you are a LL the onus on you to keep abreast of legislation and requirements.
The RTB website is quite well laid out and contains the information a LL might need and if you need certainty the Irish laws and statutes are also easily available on line. To quote someone else if you can manage to get to AAM and make posts you can manoeuvre through the RTB and the Irish statutes!
To answer your question?
This from the RTB website.
From June 4th 2019 changes to the law mean the landlord is obliged to offer the tenant an opportunity to re-let the property if they do not sell it within 9 months and once the tenant provided their contact details in writing to the landlord within 28 days of receipt of the notice of termination.
 

AlbacoreA

Frequent Poster
Messages
3,382
That seems to infer we should ignore the current crisis and stick to the legislation no matter how disconnected from reality it is.

It also seems to infer that anyone asking a question that refers to legislation, isn't aware of the legislation, despite a knowledge of the legislation being required to ask the question in the first place.

I think there are couple of get out loopholes in it myself.
 
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