evergreen fund

Shiram

Registered User
Messages
39
I've been paying into Evergreen for the last 2 and a half years. Luckily I won't need to access the cash for the next few years so I reckon I'm going to stick it out.
 

mydosh

Frequent Poster
Messages
13
I think a lot of people could do with Googling "pound cost averaging". It might provide some comfort.

On another note, if this investment is causing you this much worry, then it is probably not for you.

Never invest in equities if you're not happy to just tuck the money away for a *minimum* of 5 years and just forget about it. If you're checking the value every 5 minutes, then you'll end up handing all your hard-earned cash over to a psychiatrist at the end of the day.
I agree with this sentinement however recent dips / crashes in the market did not (I believe) last this long or stay on a continuous decline for such a long period as our current situation. Additionally the sub-prime situation is an additional variable running side by side with US heading into potential recession....lots of depressing news to absorb for someone who's new to equities. For sure one has to take the long term view as guessing the markets is a flawed game. But in days of uncertainty like these it is difficult to find strong independant opinions. This forum at least is good for airing these concerns.

gebbel; said:
ClubMan is right in stating that you cannot take the advice of a tied agent in this matter. When I went to Bank of Ireland to withdraw my €12K from this fund, the advisor gave me all kinds of reasons as to why I was making the wrong decision. I am happy now that I ignored him, he is hardly independent!!
Good luck whatever decision you make.
BTW, I've setup a meeting with BoI investement advisor for tomorrow lunchtime and on the phone she's already saying now is the time to buy...and I guess she read the "pound cost averaging" thingy. Interesting that bank advisors advice is to stick with the investements...no brainer there then! Ordinarily I wouldn't be so concerned its just like I said this seem to be a strange period in the markets....not just an ordinary dip I think.

BTW I'm new to this market watching so the above rambling is no way meant to be authorative - just throwing out my opinions.
 
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crumdub12

Frequent Poster
Messages
934
Never invest in equities if you're not happy to just tuck the money away for a *minimum* of 5 years and just forget about it. If you're checking the value every 5 minutes, then you'll end up handing all your hard-earned cash over to a psychiatrist at the end of the day.
Putting money away for 5 years in todays market ..... the price has dropped over 3 quarters by 12 % , at the very least people need to access if continuing contributions.
 
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coman

Guest
i have lump sum invested but it is guaranteed with Evergreen, i have my childrens allowance going into it which isnt guaranteed. I sometimes think what am i going to do if i lose all that as it was for their education but i am going to ride it out and i dont want to see any statement for at least five years! As it is a small amount all i want is to get back what i put it what is the possibility of this happening?
 
J

jenny-walsh

Guest
The advice I was given when investing my money (advised by an independant financial advisor) is that the Evergreen fund was less volatile than most because they investsted in so many different areas nationally and internationally and were good at sticking to less volatile areas, where downturns weren't felt as badly. I'm wondering now was he getting a commission from BOI, although I've had my ear glued to different reports and they're mostly expecting it to level out and pick up by the end of the year.
I've 10k invested, I think I'll ride out the storm.
 

ClubMan

Frequent Poster
Messages
43,866
The advice I was given when investing my money (advised by an independant financial advisor)
Just curious ... what sort of independent financial advisor? Multi-agency intermediary or authorised advisor?
is that the Evergreen fund was less volatile than most because they investsted in so many different areas nationally and internationally and were good at sticking to less volatile areas, where downturns weren't felt as badly.
Maybe that is still true? Have you compared evergreen to fund with a similar risk/reward profile and asset mix and then also to those with a higher or lower risk/reward profile to see how it's doing relatively?
 
J

jenny-walsh

Guest
Just curious ... what sort of independent financial advisor? Multi-agency intermediary or authorised advisor?
Maybe that is still true? Have you compared evergreen to fund with a similar risk/reward profile and asset mix and then also to those with a higher or lower risk/reward profile to see how it's doing relatively?
Multi Agency, I do my best to compare and contrast but my head isn't the best when it comes to the jargon, bit of a mind bender for a dunce like myself! :D
Research, research, research- in the end I invested with evergreen cos the best I could figure it was less volatile than most, though not without it's risks but that's all part of these investments eh? Though I think I'll bide my time, ride out the storm then move it all to a regular savings account.
 
S

Sharon O'Bri

Guest
Read ure comments with interest, about the only interest i'm getting this weather! my husband and I invested €100k, his redundancy, half n half in Evergreen and Trilogy II. We're thinking of cutting our losses, about €12k at this stage. I don't think the market will make a magical recovery any time soon. We seem to be so interlinked with the US Markets and with it being an election year the markets there could take some time to settle. I agree investments are for the long haul but some times you're better off not throwing good money after bad.
Singed Fingers
 
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gebbel

Frequent Poster
Messages
1,001
my husband and I invested €100k, his redundancy, half n half in Evergreen and Trilogy II. We're thinking of cutting our losses, about €12k at this stage. I don't think the market will make a magical recovery any time soon.
Ask yourself first do you need the money now? If not then it might be foolish (regardless of all you have read in this thread) and impulsive to bail out now. You may recoup the losses. The more I think about it €12K is too much to lose at this stage. My advice is to hang on if you can.
 
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WombleWilly

Guest
Putting money away for 5 years in todays market ..... the price has dropped over 3 quarters by 12 % , at the very least people need to access if continuing contributions.
OK.

a) Selling won't recover you that 12%
b) "Previous performance is not a good indicator of future performance"

Look at the company fundamentals is my advice. If they look good, and the price is cheap, buy.

Market sentiment in 2003 when the FTSE was around 3,500 was pretty poor at the time. Even sitting on the lossed of the last few months, anyone who bought then would be sitting on a 52% profit, excluding dividends.
 
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WombleWilly

Guest
I agree with this sentinement however recent dips / crashes in the market did not (I believe) last this long or stay on a continuous decline for such a long period as our current situation. Additionally the sub-prime situation is an additional variable running side by side with US heading into potential recession....lots of depressing news to absorb for someone who's new to equities. For sure one has to take the long term view as guessing the markets is a flawed game. But in days of uncertainty like these it is difficult to find strong independant opinions. This forum at least is good for airing these concerns.
The bear market that started in 2000 took 3 years to iron itself out. During that time we had Enron, 9/11, threats of a US recession, European economy in a slump, Iraq invasion etc. etc. However, if you'd invested small amounts over a regular basis during that whole period, you'd be sitting on a tidy profit today, in spite of what's happened in the last few months.

There is always risk out there. What you've got to ask yourself is whether the market is pricing that in already. With BOI on a div yield of around 8%, and PE of less than 10, there are not many times when you can buy that kind of value, even if earnings fall over the short term.

You don't just lose money by buying and seeing the price drop. You also lose it by selling or holding back when panicked, and later having to buy back those investments at a higher price when short-term worries have ironed themselves out.
 

lawdie

Frequent Poster
Messages
13
We're thinking of cutting our losses, about €12k at this stage. I don't think the market will make a magical recovery any time soon. We seem to be so interlinked with the US Markets and with it being an election year the markets there could take some time to settle. I agree investments are for the long haul but some times you're better off not throwing good money after bad.
Theres some basic questions you need to ask before you write off 12k. Did you really invest for "the long haul" or just when the current unit prices rose. Is the fund fundamentally flawed in its structure. Has this proved to be a weak return over any seven year period. Does it truly diversify in terms of asset classes, mix and etc.

The old quote from my now deceased commerce teacher was always buy low and sell high. The unit prices of most funds are low, will they see a high, that inevitably is yes in most cases. When, can't say. But thats what investing is all about, you still possess the same number of units/shares but have a low value. A little patience should see it right, it has in the past. But its your money.
 

jrewing

Frequent Poster
Messages
554
Warren Buffett said something along the lines of....
"When investors are greedy, be wary; when investors are wary, be greedy"

i.e. this should be looked upon as an opportunity for buying rather than taking a hit.
 

tyoung

Frequent Poster
Messages
143
With respect Jr, the problem that I have with that analysis is that it artificially separates the individual investor from the overall market. You are part of the market! If you are feeling confident so might a surprisingly large number of investors be.
From personal experience the two times when I was worried about my own losses (Nov 87 and Spring 03 ) were significant bottoms in the market.
Basically my own instincts were in sync with the "Market" that I thought I could outsmart!
Regards
 
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WombleWilly

Guest
With respect Jr, the problem that I have with that analysis is that it artificially separates the individual investor from the overall market. You are part of the market! If you are feeling confident so might a surprisingly large number of investors be.
From personal experience the two times when I was worried about my own losses (Nov 87 and Spring 03 ) were significant bottoms in the market.
Basically my own instincts were in sync with the "Market" that I thought I could outsmart!
Regards

Recent Events Syndrome: A well known difficulty for many small investors who foolishly over-weight the effect of recent events above that of long term trends.

You can't beat looking at company fundamentals. Reading charts is no better than reading tea-leaves.

The opportunity to market-outperform on your investments is to ignore "gut instinct" (which is "herd instinct" in reality), and focus of buying cheaper, and selling dear. '87 and '03 a perfect examples of that.
 

Chamol

Registered User
Messages
2
Hello all. This post of mine follows the thoughts and comments regarding the Evergreen Fund BOI and relates first my experience with Irish Life Scope and then my transfer into Evergreen! :( - From reading the posts - There is a real sense of 'leave the money invested for at least 5 years and you will do ok!' - and these were the words of my Irish Permanent advisor when I handed over 20,000 Irish Punts to invest in Irish Life Scope in the year 2000 - equally shared across High, Average and Low risk - US. , European and Irish investments. I did not need the money then and just 'forgot about it' - 4 years later and it had reached 11,000 !!! :( Then I continued to leave it and it started to lift! Very slowly! - In early 2007 it had reached the all time high of 18,000 Euro's (Not punts!!) - Then in March 2007 it started to rapidly fall again! So I too it out! - Bad Move? Good Move? - I had invested the equivqlent of 25,000 Euros in 2000 and was now in 2007 withdrawing 18,000 Euros! - Then after this I paused for thought and eventually was convinced by an BOI Investment advisor who sympatised with me regarding how awful the Scope performance had been and how all advisors were shocked by it :) - I was advised to invest 10,000 euros in Evergreen! - in November last! - Today its worth 8800 Euros - I was then advised to not worry - 5 years at least and you will do ok! - Familiar sounding to me who lost with Scope! Is this the same scenario! - Oh what to do now! ... any advice appreciated! Chamol :(
 

joe sod

Frequent Poster
Messages
718
The bear market that started in 2000 took 3 years to iron itself out. During that time we had Enron, 9/11, threats of a US recession, European economy in a slump, Iraq invasion etc. etc. However, if you'd invested small amounts over a regular basis during that whole period, you'd be sitting on a tidy profit today, in spite of what's happened in the last few months.

There is always risk out there. What you've got to ask yourself is whether the market is pricing that in already. With BOI on a div yield of around 8%, and PE of less than 10, there are not many times when you can buy that kind of value, even if earnings fall over the short term.

You don't just lose money by buying and seeing the price drop. You also lose it by selling or holding back when panicked, and later having to buy back those investments at a higher price when short-term worries have ironed themselves out.
I presume you are referring to the irish market when talking about the 2000 slump, however one key factor not mentioned is that the iseq was not really in the 2000 boom because we had few high tech companies in it , however the dow and nasdaq were where all the action was in the 2000 boom, the nasdaq has never fully recovered the heights of 2000, the dow did a year ago but has retreated from it, and also the dollar has fallen 60% since then so that in euro terms the dow is still way off its 2000 high, this slump has directly affected the iseq because the cause is financials not high tech, that is why the iseq has been so heavily hit this time but not in 2000
 
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