Entitled to Dole?

Discussion in 'Redundancy, unemployment & jobseekers entitlements' started by mickeyg, Oct 27, 2016.

  1. mickeyg

    mickeyg Frequent Poster

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    306
    My contract of 16 months is ending at the end of November. During this time my employer has been deducting tax, PRSI etc and everything has been paid and up to date. The 2 odd years before this contract started I was not employed (travelling) but other than that I would have been paying PRSI stamps for all of my working life - I am 58 now.
    Post November I will be actively looking for further employment.
    My wife is currently employed and earning a good salary.
    Given these circumstances will I be able to claim any thing from social welfare??
     
  2. moneybox

    moneybox Frequent Poster

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    It's doubtful you will be entitled to anything as jobseekers benefit goes from previous two years employment. What you paid down through years is not relevant except for state pension purposes. You can make claim for jobseekers allowance but it will be means tested and partner's salary taken into account. Even if you are turned down. you should sign on for credits as you have already lost two years contributions due to your travelling.
     
  3. Protocol

    Protocol Frequent Poster

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    2,554
    Rules for JSB:

    http://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/Jobseeker's-Benefit.aspx#l1f4da

    Rules
    To qualify for Jobseeker's Benefit you must be aged under 66 and:

    • Be unemployed (you must be fully unemployed or unemployed for at least 4 days out of 7)
    • Have had a substantial loss of employment and as a result be unemployed for at least 4 days out of 7
    • Be capable of work
    • Be available for and genuinely seeking work
    • Have enough social insurance (PRSI) contributions
    You can read more about the conditions for getting a jobseeker's payment and about the employment services the Department of Social Protection offers to jobseekers. There are some exceptions to the rules for pregnant women around the time of birth.
     
  4. Protocol

    Protocol Frequent Poster

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    2,554
    Social insurance (PRSI) contributions
    To qualify for Jobseeker's Benefit, you must pay Class A, H or P PRSI contributions. Class A is the one paid by most private sector employees. Class H is paid by soldiers, reservists and temporary army nurses, who do not qualify for Jobseeker's Benefit until they have left the army. To qualify you need:

    • At least 104 weeks PRSI paid since you first started work
    And

    • 39 weeks PRSI paid or credited in the relevant tax year (a minimum of 13 weeks must be paid contributions*)
    Or

    • 26 weeks PRSI paid in the relevant tax year and 26 weeks PRSI paid in the tax year immediately before the relevant tax year.
    *If you do not have 13 paid contributions in the relevant tax year, you must have paid 13 contributions in any of the following years:

    • The 2 tax years before the relevant tax year
    • The last complete tax year
    • The current tax year.
    The relevant tax year is the second last complete tax year before the year in which your claim is made. So, for claims made in 2016, the relevant tax year is 2014.

    There are a number of circumstances in which you can be awarded credited contributions. For example, pre-entry credits are given when you start employment for the first time in your working life. However, you can only qualify for Jobseeker's Benefit when you have actually paid 104 contributions. Credits are also awarded while you are getting certain social welfare payments, including Jobseeker's Benefit (provided it is for 6 days), Illness Benefit and, in some cases, Jobseeker's Allowance.

    Contributions you have paid in other member states of the EU/EEA will be added to your Irish contributions. If you are applying for Jobseeker's Benefit and need the contributions paid in another EU/EEA country to help you qualify, then your last contribution must have been in Ireland.

    Under the Social Welfare (Consolidation) Act 2005 employers are obliged to register all employees for PRSI. Read more in our document on your Employer's duty to pay social insurance.
     
  5. Black Sheep

    Black Sheep Frequent Poster

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    2,113
    It appears Jobseekers Allowance (means tested) is unlikely as your wife has a good income.

    Jobseekers Benefit is likely as you appear to satisfy the PRSI conditions
    • 104 Contributions since starting work
    • 13 + contributions in 2015
    • 13 + contributions in 2016
     
    ppmeath likes this.
  6. moneybox

    moneybox Frequent Poster

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    715
    From reading the regulations, it appears the relevant tax year for the OP is 2014, a year when he wasnt contributing.
     
  7. mickeyg

    mickeyg Frequent Poster

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    306
    Actually Moneybox that was my interpretation too i.e. that I do not qualify as I did not have 39 weeks PRSI paid in the "relevant year" which is 2014.
    Further question is there any flexibility or can they apply any flexibility regarding relevant years etc. as it would appear I have just been unfortunate with the timings!
     
  8. elcato

    elcato Moderator

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    2,652
    No flexibility with the jobseekers benefit but that's why they means test the allowance as that is effectively the same thing.
     
  9. ppmeath

    ppmeath Frequent Poster

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    My reading is the same as Blacksheeps.

    If you don't have the 39 weeks in 2014, then you must have 26 and 13 of them have to be paid, if you don't have them, then you need 13 paid in 2014 - which you don't have, then you have to have 13 in 2012, the last complete tax year or the current year 2016.



    "And

    • 39 weeks PRSI paid or credited in the relevant tax year (a minimum of 13 weeks must be paid contributions*)
    Or

    • 26 weeks PRSI paid in the relevant tax year and 26 weeks PRSI paid in the tax year immediately before the relevant tax year.
    *If you do not have 13 paid contributions in the relevant tax year, you must have paid 13 contributions in any of the following years:

    • The 2 tax years before the relevant tax year
    • The last complete tax year
    • The current tax year."
    As Blacksheep said - you have 104 since you started work and 13+ in 2015 and 13+ in 2016.
     
  10. gipimann

    gipimann Frequent Poster

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    4,617
    The 104 +13+13 isn't enough to be eligible for Jobseekers Benefit. The "39" contribution rule still applies.

    The rule states that there must be 39 weeks paid or credited in the relevant tax year, of which 13 must be paid.

    In 2016, a person applying must have 39 contributions in 2014, of which 13 must be paid contributions.
    If there were fewer than 13 weeks paid contributions in 2014, other years can be looked at to satisfy the paid contribution requirement, but there is still the overall requirement to have 39 contributions for 2014.

    It would appear that the OP is not eligible for Jobseeker's Benefit.
    The relevant tax year will change in January, so depending on the number of contributions paid in 2015, you may become eligible from January if you are still unemployed.
     
    moneybox likes this.