English Living In Ireland Since 1997 can I Get A Passport?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Non-financial Questions' started by paulgreen, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. paulgreen

    paulgreen Frequent Poster

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    Hi the family moved to Ireland in 1997 when my job relocated kid's brought up here one working in Dublin would we have a right to Irish passports or do we have to go down the citizenship route?Just wondered if my residence for 20 years counts for anything????
     
  2. suzie

    suzie Frequent Poster

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  3. Bronte

    Bronte Frequent Poster

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    If you do get one, I'd hold on to your English one too. Could be very handy, and very important for your children.
     
  4. so-crates

    so-crates Frequent Poster

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    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
    Passports from any government are generally only issued to citizens. The question is really are you entitled to citizenship in Ireland. Remember that you can hold multiple citizenship, there is no requirement for you to relinquish your British citizenship if you decide to take Irish citizenship (this varies from country to country. Some countries insist on you renouncing your other citizenship). As you have lived here since 1997 you are probably a shoe-in for Irish citizenship.

    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/e...izenship/who_can_become_an_irish_citizen.html

    http://www.citizensinformation.ie/e..._an_irish_citizen_through_naturalisation.html

    http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/WP16000022#eu-eea-swiss
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  5. cremeegg

    cremeegg Frequent Poster

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    I think the OPs question is does he have to apply for citizenship at a cost of well over €1,000 or is he actually already a citizen based on his long standing residence in the country.

    Every citizen is entitled to a passport cost €80. The question of who is a citizen is unclear. With respect to Socrates his links are about how those who are not Irish citizens can become so.

    It appears that the OP is not an Irish citizen and would have to apply for citizenship and the cost involved.
     
  6. Gerry Canning

    Gerry Canning Frequent Poster

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    Paul , I am not sure but if either of your grandparents were born anywhere in the 32 counties you can get a passport ?
     
  7. paulgreen

    paulgreen Frequent Poster

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    Thanks for the replies pretty sure my dads mother was Irish but I never met her both are now deceased and I have no paperwork.I am hopeful when britexit shakes out that we will all be given a euro passport or perhaps all English in Ireland will be given an Irish passport for free????? Either way I assume some kind of accommodation will take place
     
  8. Thirsty

    Thirsty Frequent Poster

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    With a bit of research you should be able to trace your grandmother's birth certificate; if she was indeed born in Ireland you will be able to apply for an Irish passport. I would make no assumptions in regards to Brexit...hope for the best, plan for the worst.
     
  9. so-crates

    so-crates Frequent Poster

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  10. paulgreen

    paulgreen Frequent Poster

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    Thanks for that if I can prove I am Irish do the wife and kids automatically qualify?
     
  11. paulgreen

    paulgreen Frequent Poster

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    Also anyone know what evidence I have to supply would it be my dads birth cert together with the mother?
     
  12. Gerry Canning

    Gerry Canning Frequent Poster

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    Paul ,

    Check the passport application site , I expect grannies cert would do ?
     
  13. so-crates

    so-crates Frequent Poster

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    In your case you'll have to register your birth on the foreign births register. The details of what documentation you'll need are in the links below

    https://www.dfa.ie/passports-citizenship/citizenship/born-abroad/
    https://www.dfa.ie/passports-citizenship/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/

    I am not sure how it will work for your wife but she would certainly have entitlements under naturalisation and possibly through marriage (although you were not an Irish citizen at the time so I am not sure how that one would work).

    Were the kids born here or in the UK?
     
  14. paulgreen

    paulgreen Frequent Poster

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