"Election proposals may make the housing crisis worse"

Brendan Burgess

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A very well written article by John Fitzgerald


He sums up the rent control argument very well

However, research across many countries by the left-leaning German Institute for Economic Research shows that rent controls significantly reduce the supply of rental accommodation. Faced with restricted rents, many landlords choose to sell, so stock leaves the rental sector.

Those who benefit from rent controls are tenants who already have a home, and people who could afford to buy. Those who lose out are people looking for a home to rent in a shrinking market, including the homeless.

The German research findings are valid for Ireland. Here, controls already in place have exacerbated the fall in supply of rental accommodation, pushing rents even higher. Prospective new tenants would fare even worse if further rent regulation were to follow after the election. Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael are opposed to such measures.
 

AlbacoreA

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This is old news. We knew about German and US experience before we tried the exact same thing and got exactly the same results.

We even implemented it in a way that made it worse, as the controls do not effect new rentals only existing rentals.
Which encourages new rentals at higher rents and existing rentals at low rents to leave the market.
There also the possibility that the new large landlords are chasing max profits for shareholders far more than a smaller LL might.
As we attract more multinationals we import more skilled labour. Added fuel to the demand.

On a discussion about a new application for expensive shared living development, that it was too expensive.
It was suggested they aimed at well paid workers who aren't even here yet.

While all this that is great for the economy. Its really blows out of the water the idea anyone is trying to fix the housing crisis.
Which is most desperate at the social and affordable end of the market. Which is almost entirely ignored by policy.
It may appear in the electioneering. But its bit late from both FF & FG, trying to pretend, they want (or will) to tackle this. It not credible.
 

SPC100

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IIRC There are at least two old large threads on aam making this point before the controls were introduced!

It's good that it gets some coverage in mainstream media though.
 

AlbacoreA

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It seems that the good work done by Eoghan Murphy is paying off with a massive increase in completions this year, a stabilisation of rents and a reduction in property prices.
I hope the next minister for housing is as good as he was.
...Look at the context...

This takes the total number of new dwelling completions last year to 21,241.

This is up from 17,952 built in 2018, a rise of up 18.3pc.
.... and net population increase of 64,500



An estimated 35,000 homes need to be built every year for the next decade to bridge the gap between supply and demand, according to a report on the Irish property market.
 
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Purple

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...Look at the context...



.... and net immgration of 64,500





Yes, and we are making great strides getting to that level of building... or do you think houses arrive here in a box? (They kind of should but for various reasons that doesn't happen).
Oh, and it is usual for more than one person to live in a house.
 

AlbacoreA

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You seem to patting someone on the back for closing the door to the stable long after the horse has bolted.

I'm just putting a tiny bit of context to these stats which are posted in isolation.
You'd need more details to get a better perspective...


There is no breakdown where the critical shortages are and how supply aligns to demographics of the demand.
Not to mention lack of transparency of low targets being set and of what was achieved.

I've only mentioned population growth. You have to add to that whatever demand already has built up over years.
 

AlbacoreA

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I think this can be converted into the past tense now. We're likely to have the opposite problem in the future.
That's the million dollar question right there.

A broken clock is right twice a day. There will be a point where the supply will meet failing demand. Whomever is playing musical chairs at the right time, will take credit for getting it right.
 

Purple

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You seem to patting someone on the back for closing the door to the stable long after the horse has bolted.
They weren't in office when the horse bolted and it bolted because the Stable was burning down. They have had to rebuild the Stable and are now in the process of getting the horse back into it.
 

AlbacoreA

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They poured fuel on those flames with their policies. Not just with housing, health service, policing, etc.

You can stretch recapitalizing the economy with foreign investment and labour only so far.
 

Purple

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They poured fuel on those flames with their policies. Not just with housing, health service, policing, etc.

You can stretch recapitalizing the economy with foreign investment and labour only so far.
Yep, but the question is would the alternative poured more fuel on the flames?
 

AlbacoreA

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We are about to find out.

It will likely coincide, with other issues, like our competitiveness disappearing etc., another boom bust cycle if perhaps shallower.
 

Purple

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We are about to find out.

It will likely coincide, with other issues, like our competitiveness disappearing etc., another boom bust cycle if perhaps shallower.
I was referring to the last government but yes, my fear is that all the additional spending in an economy with full employment which is already overheating will cause another boom-bust cycle.
In the longer term the target should be to deliver public services more efficiently as when the State spends a big chunk of the money within the economy they are the main driver of such cycles.
 

AlbacoreA

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For those currently adversely effected the economy is already broken/bust for them.
This forum is largely not of that demographic.

Public services across all sectors are mostly swamped and unable to cope with demand.
Yes they are inefficient. But demand exceeds their resources. All we are doing is increasing those demands.

If you stretch something too far, something will break. In this case its was the two party status quo.
 
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Purple

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For those currently adversely effected the economy is already broken/bust for them.
This forum is largely not of that demographic.

Public services across all sectors are mostly swamped and unable to cope with demand.
Yes they are inefficient. But demand exceeds their resources. All we are doing is increasing those demands.

If you stretch something too far, something will break. In this case its was the two party status quo.
The Public Sector has not expanded at the same rate as the economy or the population. It certainly needs more resources but it will get far better results by using the resources it has more efficiently. ANd to repeat what I have said here many times, people are not efficient or inefficient rather the structures they work within are efficient or inefficient.
 

AlbacoreA

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I realised that, I just didn't bother to change it. The pertinent point being that demand is always (in recent years) increasing. Which has an impact on availability of housing.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

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I realised that, I just didn't bother to change it. The pertinent point being that demand is always (in recent years) increasing. Which has an impact on availability of housing.
Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts.
 

AlbacoreA

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The Public Sector has not expanded at the same rate as the economy or the population. It certainly needs more resources but it will get far better results by using the resources it has more efficiently. ANd to repeat what I have said here many times, people are not efficient or inefficient rather the structures they work within are efficient or inefficient.
A good example of this is the current NCT issue with the lifts. The entire system is unable to communicate a coherent message of what people should do. It's dysfunctional.
 
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