Eir webmail - can't access now though same password for many years

elainem

Frequent Poster
Messages
611
Hi! I have an eir webmail account - and I have the same password for 15 years. It's really wierd password, so I doubt anyone has it. Anyway, I got into my emails today in work. However, when I came home this evening and tried to get in to my email account it said my log in could not be found. I typed everything in correctly, so I don't know what is wrong - I did it 9 or 10 times. When I went to look at the security questions to then try and reset my password - I didn't recognise the security questions - it's years ago since I answered them, and it's not the standard ones of what is your mother's maiden name. I will be lost without my email. I don't have eircom broadband or phoen, so techinical support won't deal with me. Is there anything I can do in this situaiton - my life is on my email Is this a glitch with eircom again? Would really welcome any advice.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

Frequent Poster
Messages
630
Eircom webmail was an awful product when I ditched it for gmail in 2005. I doubt it has got any better. Why on earth are you still using it?


Eir will be legally obliged to give you access as it is your personal data. You may have to spend a lot of time on the phone and/or writing letters to them though.

Download your inbox, back it up, and then move to gmail.
 

1dave123

Frequent Poster
Messages
128
Hi ..... I have eir webmail too and this happens to me at least 2-3 times a year. On every occasion it has fixed itself - so I suggest u try again with the same password later today or tomorrow. Good chance it will be working fine again.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

Frequent Poster
Messages
630
Hi ..... I have eir webmail too and this happens to me at least 2-3 times a year.
It's an awful service! Why on earth don't you change provider? After about a decade of badgering I finally convinced my dad to ditch it for gmail last year and he hasn't looked back.
 

banchang

Frequent Poster
Messages
38
Eircom webmail was an awful product when I ditched it for gmail in 2005. I doubt it has got any better. Why on earth are you still using it?


Eir will be legally obliged to give you access as it is your personal data. You may have to spend a lot of time on the phone and/or writing letters to them though.

Download your inbox, back it up, and then move to gmail.
How far do they have to go back ? They delete mail after a certain age don't they ?
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,062
I am not an expert on the law.

I would think whatever is held on the server is legally yours.
It depends on the service, some you will retain ownership, others insist you give them full ownership in return for providing the service.

Most such services are pretty careful so that their terms of service ensure they have limited to no responsibility for such data once you are no longer a customer.
 

Purple

Frequent Poster
Messages
9,001
It depends on the service, some you will retain ownership, others insist you give them full ownership in return for providing the service.

Most such services are pretty careful so that their terms of service ensure they have limited to no responsibility for such data once you are no longer a customer.
How is that GDPR compliant?
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,062
How is that GDPR compliant?
Most email contents don't come under GDPR protection, and GDPR places no obligation on the retention of such data, in fact it is recommended that companies delete sensitive data of past customers.

General data protection advice is if you need to send any covered PII over email that you only do so via encrypted attachments due to the ease at which email traffic can be intercepted / leaked.
 

Purple

Frequent Poster
Messages
9,001
Most email contents don't come under GDPR protection, and GDPR places no obligation on the retention of such data, in fact it is recommended that companies delete sensitive data of past customers.

General data protection advice is if you need to send any covered PII over email that you only do so via encrypted attachments due to the ease at which email traffic can be intercepted / leaked.
Sure, but how do they claim ownership of the contents of your emails?
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,062
Sure, but how do they claim ownership of the contents of your emails?
It's all in the small print, to get access to use the service, you need to accept their terms. Most people don't read these. Terms vary by provider, but at the very least you're giving them rights to scan and reuse any data you send or store via the service for marketing or other (at times vague) purposes, in some cases you effectively give them shared ownership where they can resuse or publish as they see fit.
 
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