Diamond Drill Bits

Leesider32

Frequent Poster
Messages
78
Hi all,

Putting up a glass shelf in the shower but have to drill through porcelain tiles!! I have 1 1/2 holes done out of 4 and after going through a normal tile drill bit and a diamond drill bit. Wondering what are the best diamond drill bits? The one I had burnt out very quickly but then again only paid €6 for it.

Just need one to get me 2 1/2 more holes drilled!!! :cool:

Thanks
 

Jazz01

Frequent Poster
Messages
787
Leesider - must be the time for drilling through porcelain tiles. I burnt through 3 drill bits in one bathroom recently - tiles were tougher than expected. I ended up buying a diamond drill bit from Cork builder providers - similar to this type. I paid €18 for it - prices vary with the type, but it did the job. Few things - I needed to drill a pilot hole first using another ceramic drill bit (like this). Once I started drilling, every 5 seconds, I had to stop, dip the drill bit into water and drill again for another 5 seconds & repeat.

Fittings I had were for a 6mm hole, so I got the diamond drill bit, sized 6mm, but found that the wall plugs were not snug enough in the hole, so had to use a larger wall plug. Just something to be aware.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Leo

mathepac

Frequent Poster
Messages
7,107
Lads, I believe the answer to your problems is to purchase "glass drills" 2nd lin above from you local DIY or builders' providers. The business end of these bits are arrow or spear shaped in the usual range of sizes and will glide through bathroom tiles (or glass) for fun.

Measure and mark out your drill spots using masking tape. To give the bit a "start", carefully puncture / break the glaze on the tile with a tap; through the tape, on a steel masonry nail with a suitable implement! Drill away having made sure there are no pipes of electric wires behind the tiles.
 

Jazz01

Frequent Poster
Messages
787
The business end of these bits are arrow or spear shaped in the usual range of sizes and will glide through bathroom tiles (or glass) for fun
Originally, I was thinking the same - although they are great for starting off, there was no gliding through the tiles, just a lot of smoke and then hissing when cooling them down. They were blunted quick enough with these tiles.
In two other bathrooms, tiles were ok to get through, but what ever tiles herself bought for the main bathroom - there was no getting through them with the normal ceramic/glass drill bit.
 

Leesider32

Frequent Poster
Messages
78
Leesider - must be the time for drilling through porcelain tiles. I burnt through 3 drill bits in one bathroom recently - tiles were tougher than expected. I ended up buying a diamond drill bit from Cork builder providers - similar to this type. I paid €18 for it - prices vary with the type, but it did the job. Few things - I needed to drill a pilot hole first using another ceramic drill bit (like this). Once I started drilling, every 5 seconds, I had to stop, dip the drill bit into water and drill again for another 5 seconds & repeat.

Fittings I had were for a 6mm hole, so I got the diamond drill bit, sized 6mm, but found that the wall plugs were not snug enough in the hole, so had to use a larger wall plug. Just something to be aware.
Thanks for that, to get started I drilled at an angle with the diamond bit but then it burnt out very quickly. Will get a new one and try dipping in water as well.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
11,303
I think the diamond coated ones as linked by Leesider work best. With the spade bits, you need constant cooling and low speed. If you're getting smoke, you've already destroyed the temper of the tip and it's only fit for the bin.

When using plugs on a tiled wall, ensure the plug is pushed in fully behind the tile, otherwise you may crack the tile when putting in the screw.
 

mathepac

Frequent Poster
Messages
7,107
Is there any chance the tiles are in fact solid marble or other material? Glazed porcelain tiles have a thin veneer of glaze over a soft body which produces orangey-red dust once the veneer is broken. Limestone is hard too, slate is soft.
 
Top