Costs of switching from gas hob to induction hob

Daenis

Frequent Poster
Messages
92
Hi due to a gas safety issue i have to change my hob and I am wondering what the installation costs might be if i switch to an induction hob (apart from the purchase cost of the hob) as I presume I would need both a registered gas installer to take out the old hob, cap off the gas connection at the hob and switch the gas back on at the meter (for my heating as the gas network disconnected it) and I would also need an electrical installer to put in the induction hob. Any ideas of what the costs might be?
 

RedOnion

Frequent Poster
Messages
3,296
Getting a gas line capped and certified isn't expensive, but there'll be a call out charge. I got it done once, but got it done at the same time as a boiler service so he didn't charge much extra.
The electrical costs will depend on how much is to be done, and how easy access is. Bringing heavy cable from fuse board to kitchen, putting in an isolation switch, and installation of the hob. Expect it to get messy with tiles getting broken to chase cable to isolation switch.
If buying the hob from an independent retailers ask for recommendations of installers. There are some who hold both RECI and RGII registration so they can do the whole job for you, rather than you being without a job while waiting on people to show up when they say they will.

Don't forget about the costs of buying pots and pans compatible with induction hob!
 

Daenis

Frequent Poster
Messages
92
Getting a gas line capped and certified isn't expensive, but there'll be a call out charge. I got it done once, but got it done at the same time as a boiler service so he didn't charge much extra.
The electrical costs will depend on how much is to be done, and how easy access is. Bringing heavy cable from fuse board to kitchen, putting in an isolation switch, and installation of the hob. Expect it to get messy with tiles getting broken to chase cable to isolation switch.
If buying the hob from an independent retailers ask for recommendations of installers. There are some who hold both RECI and RGII registration so they can do the whole job for you, rather than you being without a job while waiting on people to show up when they say they will.

Don't forget about the costs of buying pots and pans compatible with induction hob!
Thanks RedOnion, I wasn't sure whether there would be installers that would have both so i will definitely ask about that, without the hob now anyway because the gas is disconnect at the meter but yes would be a lot better to get it done in one go, am in the lucky and unusual position that all my pots and pans are induction compatible so only thing i might have to invest in is a new wok but i guess i can't be 100% certain of that until i try them.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,362
Gas is preferable to electric for cooking.
Gas transfers ~40% of consumed energy to the food, induction hobs transfer ~90%. Induction hobs also have a much faster reaction time and can maintain a lower simmer temperature than gas can without the blow out risk.

Pro chefs, including a number of Michelin starred ones, have been moving over to induction for a while now, some still prefer the visual cues from the flames (also handy if you flambé) but induction makes for a much cooler kitchen.
 

Baby boomer

Registered User
Messages
40
Gas is preferable to electric for cooking. And also for heating,
I used to swear by gas and wouldn't even have contemplated induction. Until I got a demo from a sibling and now I'm totally converted. It's just as responsive, it's faster to get to the boil and - the best bit IMO - much easier to keep a pot on a slow simmer.

Also far easier to clean. Wouldn't revert to gas now.
 
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