Can you appeal a sum awarded in court

Discussion in 'Askaboutlaw' started by rion, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. rion

    rion Frequent Poster

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    Can anyone advise me,

    I'm looking for some info on a sum awarded to a family friend. It looks like she is awarded 350,000 so she will be taking my Aunts house and her money.

    The same thing happened myself and my sisters but we did not claim and didn't look into it till recently as our heads just weren't in the right place.

    My question is can we appeal the decision to give her all the money, the money was awarded to her today but for some reason it is put back for finalising till the 27th of July which was requested from my aunts solicitor. Does this mean we may have time to claim.
     
  2. Ravima

    Ravima Frequent Poster

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    2,170
    You need to post more info, but be aware that this is a public forum.

    Did your 'family friend' sue your aunt? If s/he did, did a judge hear the case and make the award? If same 'thing' happened you and your sisters, why did you not sue?

    if it is a court award, then the only people who can appeal ad Plaintiff (family friend) and Defendant (aunt).

    You have time to claim if you are within the statute of limitations - normally 2 years from time of injury or 2 years from 18th birthday if the injury occurred before you were 18.
     
  3. rion

    rion Frequent Poster

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    Aw it looks like we are out of the timeframe, Yes the family friend sued my Aunt who has since passed leaving what was left to my aunt and 2 uncles. It was awarded today but they did not no what was to happen in court today so the sent a solicitor. The solicitor somehow has it put back to be finalised on the 27th of July. The family friend had barristers there.
     
  4. rion

    rion Frequent Poster

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    Could my aunt and 2 uncles appeal it?
     
  5. rion

    rion Frequent Poster

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    This happened 7 years ago
     
  6. tallpaul

    tallpaul Frequent Poster

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    I don't mean to be rude but if you want help, you need to state what information you are looking for in a logical way with as much information as is prudent to reveal but at the same time allows users here to be able to form an opinion. Personally, I have no idea what you are asking!
     
    SBarrett likes this.
  7. T McGibney

    T McGibney Frequent Poster

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    Clearly these questions are unsuitable for discussion on a public web forum. The OP should not divulge any information that might prejudice their case. However without such information, nobody here can help in any meaningful way.
     
  8. rion

    rion Frequent Poster

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    It was a sexual abuse case, at the time we didn't feel as if we could go threw another case as it took so much out of us going threw it all again. Now tho we feel different as we feel he took so much from our lives
     
  9. Palerider

    Palerider Frequent Poster

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    You need specific legal advice and you need this without delay, do not allow anything detract you from at least getting solid advice that you understand and can rely upon.

    Next steps should become clearer after you have spoken with the solicitor in detail.
     
    Ravima and rion like this.
  10. Ravima

    Ravima Frequent Poster

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    Like Palerider says, you need legal advice and fast!
     
  11. DirectDevil

    DirectDevil Frequent Poster

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    On the specific issue of time there is a limit within which to bring proceedings for personal injuries - generally 2 years.

    It may be possible to commence proceedings outside the relevant time limit. That may involve a contested application before a judge for liberty to enlarge the time limit to bring proceedings.

    If the main asset from which the prospective plaintiff hopes to achieve financial satisfaction of any award is the house mentioned above a notice would need to be filed against the title of the property to preserve prospects of recovery (e.g. lis pendens). This is based on the practical principle that if there is no asset to discharge any judgment any legal action would be futile.

    However, as others say, legal advice is required and promptly.