Pitch of roof & Height of ceiling ?

Discussion in 'Homes and gardens' started by CubicYard1, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. CubicYard1

    CubicYard1 Registered User

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    31
    Hi,

    Can anyone tell me the minimum spec for the pitch of roof and height of ceiling for new build ?

    I am think 30-40 degrees and 2.5m ?

    Thx
    CY1
     
  2. nutty nut

    nutty nut Frequent Poster

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    Depends on several factors. The minimum pitch for slates for example would be 22 degrees but you need to take into account the wind exposure and resultant loading. Maybe you want to have rooms in the attic area and in which case there are specific regs regarding the ceiling heights.
     
  3. sydthebeat

    sydthebeat Frequent Poster

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    the local authority will have suggested pitches to suit vernacular architecture.....

    2.4 m is min height to comply with regs...
    are you talking about a dormer room, storey and a half, or full two storey dwelling??
     
  4. CubicYard1

    CubicYard1 Registered User

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    31
    Two story self-build. we may have to reduce ceiling height to 2.4m and pitch to 25-30 degrees to comply with condition on house height. just wondering where we can save...
     
  5. pudzer

    pudzer Frequent Poster

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    136
    Hi Cubic Yard,

    We've just been down this route with the planners. We were limited in height also and I was adamant that I wanted to go into my attic - I just can't stomach have a void up above my head and not having access to it -if only for the occasional visitor.

    Anyway, we're going to cut into our site - just a little but enough to comply with the conditions. Have you actually got you planning permission yet? If so, can you provide alittle more detail and I may be able to help. What size is your house? What size and level is your site (I ask that because if you have a reasonably large site, you may not even notice digging down 50-70cm.

    Also, I got a contour survey done by an engineer - pain on the wallet but felt better after I saw the results - means we only have to dig down 30am on one side - large site so hopefully it won't take from the house asthetically.
     
  6. davidoco

    davidoco Frequent Poster

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    991
    To be a habital room it is suggested in the 1997 regs that you have a minimum ceiling height of 2.4 metres over 50% of the area measured on a plane (check check) mm above ffl.

    A bungalow type dwelling 30 feet wide with a roof pitch of just over 45 degress with the rafters placed on top of the wall plate placed on top of the first floor floor joists will give a room width of just over 4 m with the 2.4m requirement met for 50% of the floor area. You would have to get this drawn out properly to see the exact measurements but your ridge height should work at about 7m
     
  7. sydthebeat

    sydthebeat Frequent Poster

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    it would be much better to redesign the dwelling into a 'narrow plan' type rather than a 'deep plan' type you probably have...... for example, assuming the same pitch, the height of the ridge increases with the distance between wallplates.......

    reducing floor to ceiling heights in living spaces to 2.4 m probably will ruin the proper proportions of those rooms. similarly reducing pitches to under 30 deg doesnt fit in with rural aesthetics....
     
  8. CubicYard1

    CubicYard1 Registered User

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    31
    already got planning. this is a final condition. we have a large site. do we not have to build the foundation from the FFL (56.4m above sea level) on the planning application ? never thought of digging down to gain the extra space. is that allowed ?
     
  9. pudzer

    pudzer Frequent Poster

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    136
    Depends on what your planning condition actually states. Ours was also a condition of planning and it explicitly stated that "the house must be Xm above existing ground level". Not sure that the planner had thought of the possibility of me digging into the site either because when I ran it by him at a post-planning meeting, he looked a bit surprised :) .

    We alsol have a big site so I don't think that digging down a little will affect the house. I have checked all this with my engineer and would recommend that you do the same - they can be very helpful. Also, check it with the person that you hope to get your planning certificate of compliance from (Engineer/Architect or whomever).

    Let me know what your actual condition states.