Survivor's pension where survivor is non resident

murphaph1

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Yes that's what I mean. You qualified for a partial pension from each country in its own right. You didn't rely on social insurance contributions in one EU state to qualify you for a partial pension in another. For example in Germany I have to have made 5 years contributions (paid or credited) under the German system to qualify for a partial German pension. If I only have say 3 years and can't get credited contributions for any more, then I will combine my German contributions with my Irish ones so that the German ones don't just vanish.
 

murphaph1

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Might have had the wrong user. There have been threads outlining how to buy back years for the uk state pension and it involves dealing with hmrc and not revenue.
Ah right but that's different. We're talking here about claiming an existing pension entitlement. What you're talking about is building up that entitlement in the first place. It's the same for me right now as I am dealing with the DSP in becoming a voluntary contributor in Ireland. That has nothing to do with the German pensions people.
 

Jim2007

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Yes that's what I mean. You qualified for a partial pension from each country in its own right. You didn't rely on social insurance contributions in one EU state to qualify you for a partial pension in another. For example in Germany I have to have made 5 years contributions (paid or credited) under the German system to qualify for a partial German pension. If I only have say 3 years and can't get credited contributions for any more, then I will combine my German contributions with my Irish ones so that the German ones don't just vanish.
Not exactly. First of all the rules don’t come into play unless you have failed to obtain a full pension in any of the member states and even when it does it is possible that some of your contributions will be lost as the objective is to maximize the total payout.
 

murphaph1

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Not exactly. First of all the rules don’t come into play unless you have failed to obtain a full pension in any of the member states and even when it does it is possible that some of your contributions will be lost as the objective is to maximize the total payout.
How is "full pension" defined in say Germany, where the system works differently and there are no fixed bands like in Ireland? Everyone's pension entitlement is calculated individually based on their contributions and credits.
 

murphaph1

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I have another question about the survivor's pension. In the case that I die while my children are still minors or in full time education, would my wife be entitled to the increase for a qualified child payment, even though they would both be living outside the state? I haven't been able to find clear guidance on that (texts usually refer to the child living in the state but I assume this may just mean the child must live where the surviving parent lives). Are there any other benefits that a survivor who is resident outside the state but in receipt of the survivor's pension might be entitled to?
 

Jim2007

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How is "full pension" defined in say Germany, where the system works differently and there are no fixed bands like in Ireland? Everyone's pension entitlement is calculated individually based on their contributions and credits.
€2,526.30 per month, as I understand it.
 

Jim2007

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Where did you get that figure Jim?
Magic.... no it's from some notes I made when looking at it for someone a few years ago. It was the maximum sum one could receive if a worker worked their entire live, paid every contribution etc.... in other words it was the cap. And as far as I know all EU/EEA/CH first pillar pensions have a cap.
 

Jim2007

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2,294
I have another question about the survivor's pension. In the case that I die while my children are still minors or in full time education, would my wife be entitled to the increase for a qualified child payment, even though they would both be living outside the state? I haven't been able to find clear guidance on that (texts usually refer to the child living in the state but I assume this may just mean the child must live where the surviving parent lives). Are there any other benefits that a survivor who is resident outside the state but in receipt of the survivor's pension might be entitled to?

Never had occasion to look at it. I'd expect it follows the same approach as other child support allowances:
- You can only claim one
- You are entitled to claim the highest one

But that is just a guess.
 

Shirazman

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411
I have another question about the survivor's pension. In the case that I die while my children are still minors or in full time education, would my wife be entitled to the increase for a qualified child payment, even though they would both be living outside the state? I haven't been able to find clear guidance on that (texts usually refer to the child living in the state but I assume this may just mean the child must live where the surviving parent lives). Are there any other benefits that a survivor who is resident outside the state but in receipt of the survivor's pension might be entitled to?

Always go to the Motherlode, in this case to the Operational Instructions -

An increase in pension is payable in respect of each qualified child who normally resides with the pensioner. A child is regarded as a qualified child up to age 18, or, if they are in full-time education by day at any university, college, school or other educational establishment, up to the end of the academic year in which the qualified child reaches age 22. ...................................

If a person is getting a pension from both Ireland and one or more of the EU or Bilateral Agreement countries listed above, an increase for qualified child is paid by one country only. It is normally paid by the country where the person receiving the pension lives.



And while you're gorging yourself there, why not have a look at the bit about

Death Benefit under the Occupational Injuries Benefits Scheme


If you manage your demise carefully, you may be able to squeeze even more money for Frau Murph out of the Welfare Insurance Fund! :p
 
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