Site Failed Percolation test. What next? Options?

Discussion in 'Sites, planning, self-builds and extensions' started by Dustyman, 12 Jan 2019.

  1. Dustyman

    Dustyman Registered User

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    27
    Last edited: 12 Jan 2019
    Hi all and thanks in advance for your replies.

    It looks like after preliminary percolation test, done this week, that our site will likely fail same.

    The site is a rural site. c.4 acres.
    We are hoping to build a 1,800 sq ft bungalow on it.
    No houses nearby (well 1 across the road, about 200 meters away).
    My wife owns the site and is from the area, born and grew up there.

    It is a 'damp' site i.e there are reeds/rushes growing on parts of it. I imagine it a heavy/boggy soil too.

    I wonder should we have got the test done at all i.e at this time of the year. I read somewhere that the only time to do a preliminary percolation on a heavy/boggy soil site is September/\October. (Found this out after the test).

    So, if the site has fails the percolation test what are our options?

    Would the person who carried out the test have informed the Co.Co? (Going to talk to him Monday).

    Surely in the 21st century there must be options? (other than selling the site for agricultural purposes).

    We really want to build there. Help!!!
     
    Last edited: 12 Jan 2019
  2. RichInSpirit

    RichInSpirit Frequent Poster

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    774
    Either a raised bed or reed bed percolation area might be options.
    There are engineers that specialize in designing these. They are not too complex but more Euros required.
     
  3. galwaypat

    galwaypat Frequent Poster

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    194
    Same thing happened me about 15 years back OH got a site from her parents we had plans to sell up in Dublin and move west and build and live mortgage free but we had problems with percolation test. Was told you get it second time if you put it in and of course more money to council. I didn't do it, I saw it as a sighn from the gods and moved to next county bought a nice house about 20 minutes from in-laws.
     
  4. noproblem

    noproblem Frequent Poster

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    1,472

    Would really love to know who told you about putting it in for a 2nd time, imo that's absolute BS. Yes, there are alternatives nowdays for the tanks, some have worked and some haven't. Personally I wouldn't touch a site with bad percolation and can never understand people who push and push to have a decision overturned. They really don't have a clue of the trouble down the road with a dodgy septic tank and it leads to an awful lot of problems, the emptying of them being one to start with, and big tractors with a massive bulk tank turning around in your drive, lawn, etc and that's only for starters. Believe me.
     
  5. galwaypat

    galwaypat Frequent Poster

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    194
    A brown envelope i suspected they were looking for at the time, well i thought at the time thats the way it was going, the brown envelope was popular at that time to get things moving.
     
  6. noproblem

    noproblem Frequent Poster

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    As I thought, pure heresay and pub gossip.
     
  7. Peanuts

    Peanuts Frequent Poster

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    46
    It really depends on the results of the percolation test. With good percolation you would only need a septic tank and percolation trench which is straightforward and cheapest in the long run (no power required). With soils that are not as good you may need a small wastewater treatment plant to treat the wastewater before it's discharged to the percolation area (or polishing filter to use its correct term when its located after a treatment plant). The treatment plant needs a power supply for a small pump and air blower but the electricity costs should be fairly low. You might also need to import good soil to create a raised polishing filter if groundwater is high. Percolation results will vary over a 4 ac site as well so you may be able to install the percolation area/polishing filter in a different part of the site. The person who undertook the percolation test (ideally an Engineer but it doesn't have to be) should be able to talk you through this but if they can't then talk to an Engineer with experience in this area and they should be able to advise.