Mature hedging

johnmurch

New Member
Messages
5
Thinking of planting some mature laurel hedging (2 metres tall) against a boundary wall with our neighbour.
Anyone got any experience of mature hedging? Seems like a fantastic alternative to a fence (which are quite expensive when labour is included, and the increased cost of timber).
 

Jazz01

Registered User
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888
@johnmurch How long is the boundary wall - two metres high is manageable, but the hedging will grow up & out and will need to be cut at least once in the growing season, so you need to factor in the cutters for it - whether those or petrol / electric & maintenance of that, clearing up & disposing of the cut offs etc. It's not much overhead, and a lot of people enjoy such, but it won't be maintenance free.

Have you priced around the hedging? Are you able to plant it yourself ? There could be a lot of stone, rock, cement & poor soil by the boundary wall, so you may need to get additional soil / compost etc when planting. The laurel hedging is a lovely hedge & easy to maintain , just doesn't like when it's roots are in water a lot of the time...
 

Leper

Registered User
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1,647
Like Jazz01 hinted hedges grow and grow and the older they get the more maintenance they require. I'm not answering your question but I'd advise that you build a wall and get your neighbour to share the cost. Put capping on the wall too. As you get older you'll enjoy all the work that you don't have to do.
 

Monbretia

Registered User
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2,068
Are you planting it against a wall? As in is there already a wall there, if so then I wouldn't bother as there is maintenance and you will lose space as it thickens. If there is no wall or fence or anything bear in mind a hedge will not stop dogs for example getting through plus who cuts the other side if it's the only boundary, I get the other side of my hedge cut on my neighbours side (we have a wall too but it's low), it's a bit of a pain plus cost and you need to get on with neighbours, not always the case!
 

mathepac

Registered User
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7,496
The laurel hedging is a lovely hedge & easy to maintain , just doesn't like when it's roots are in water a lot of the time...
All laurel hedging, leaves, berries, stems, roots is poisonous to humans, pets, and livestock, the exception is bay laurel (Laurus nobilis). It produces the bay leaves used in cooking.

Laurel produces hydrocyanic acid and can in fact make soil poisonous for other plants.

Please check what you are planting
 

lledlledlled

Registered User
Messages
384
For maximum wildlife and security benefit, I'd go with hawthorn.
It is very thorny though. You'll probably need to get someone to cut it once a year when you get too old to do it.
It is beautiful though.
 

johnmurch

New Member
Messages
5
Thanks everyone. The wall is only about 1 metre high so it gives no privacy from our neighbours. The hedge would be going against this wall. I'm shying away from a fence because the wall is narrow and I'm not sure if it could carry the fence, especially during a storm.
The cutting of the hedge from our neighbour's side raises a good question. At the moment, they have a massive tree that comes over our property and I pay for the cutting of overhanging branches. I wouldn't be expected to cut the hedge on their side, would I? They would have the freedom to cut any overhang of course.
 

Monbretia

Registered User
Messages
2,068
Well they might not be too happy to have the upkeep and cost of cutting what is your hedge either! My neighbours while nice enough did complain about my hedge overhanging the wall and into their space, now while I suppose technically that is their problem and they are entitled to cut it it's a bit mean to expect them to do so when it's my hedge! There was no need for them to complain as I had always had that side trimmed when getting the rest trimmed before they moved in but obviously they thought I was leaving them with the problem! They then whinged though that the guy cutting it had left cuttings in their driveway, I went out myself with the wheelbarrow expecting a load and didn't even get enough to cover the bottom of wheelbarrow so hardly loads!

Only today I was in the garden and neighbour passed by and asked when hedges were being cut! I suppose the fact that you are cutting their overhanging tree and paying for it yourself muddies the waters a bit. A fine mature laurel hedge will require at least one cut a year but they are lovely and I'm sorry I didn't plant laurel rather than the dreaded leylandii but too late now. They do encroach though into garden with every year but all hedges will do that.

The lotto answer would be pleached trees :)
 

Jazz01

Registered User
Messages
888
@johnmurch If you are planting the hedge, then I would expect that you cut the hedge facing their side.
If the garden size can take it, leave a gap between the wall and the hedge, which will allow you to trim the inside & leave any off cuts fall down on your side of the wall. Ideally you'd want to cut the hedge at least once (but if able to do it yourself, do it twice a year) - it should be just minimum trim/cuts, no woody stems, just new growth, so will easily break down if you decide to leave it like that...
 

2bmortgagefree

Registered User
Messages
27
Laurel as another poster has pointed is not the best for soil and wildlife. Also its roots could damage the boundary wall. Have you considered privet hedging doesn't grow too wild and would be easier maintain?
 
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