Kitchen remodel quote

Tintagel

Registered User
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498
I will be changing about 60% of my kitchen. Two walls of presses will basically stay the same design in the same location. But now incorporating two other blank walls in the area where we used to sit. I think most of my kitchen presses are standard size.

It seems a shame not to use the existing cabinets, just get rid of the doors and put new doors on top. Is this stupid thinking? My mind even said to me that I could move some of the cabinets that we are taking out and put them in the new area and reuse.

Is there any value in an old kitchen? It is a solid cherry wood kitchen. How about hinges, door handles.....cabinets?

Or do I just dump the lot and start from new?
 

RedOnion

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6,194
Is there any value in an old kitchen?
Not really. Unless someone can use it without having to get more matching units made its kind of worthless.

You might get someone looking for a few handles to match something they already have, but that's about it. It does seem a shame with a quality solid wood kitchen.

You should be able to reuse the carcasses, and just pop on new doors, but I'd avoid moving them around too much. Alternatively you could go for a painted kitchen, and keep all your existing doors but them them painted in same colour.
 

IsleOfMan

Registered User
Messages
875
Many years ago we put our old kitchen in the garage rather than dump it.

Thinking of doing the same with current kitchen. How much roughly would it cost to have old kitchen taken down and put in place in garage. One wall of garage with salvageable presses, above and below plus existing counter top?
 

RedOnion

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6,194
How much roughly would it cost to have old kitchen taken down and put in place in garage.
It really depends. If the kitchen was installed as 'standard' units, it's a case of taking out a few screws, removing the counter top, and lifting out the units. But it's not always easy - the last kitchen I helped with had been built in-situ, and we had to enlist the persuasive force of a sledgehammer to remove some units.

A fitter will generally quote on the assumption that it's going in a skip. I'd expect it would cost you the price of a few rounds of drinks to get the kitchen removed a bit more carefully and lifted to the garage.
 

Monbretia

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2,331
Could try put it up on local FB page, target it as suitable for upcycling as in painting or for a garage or store room/garage. It's not likely someone will buy it as a working kitchen, the chances of someone wanting what is now an old style kitchen is slim plus the job of moving it and reinstalling it. I see loads of kitchens for sale on marketplace, small money and I wonder if any sell!

When I was doing my I wanted to keep one existing wall of presses and change the doors but as they were not standard size the carpenter said it would be more hassle than it was worth and all I was trying to save was the carcasses which was the cheapest part of the kitchen. In hindsight he was totally right, it looks so much better with all matching and more regular sizes.
 

Leo

Moderator
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14,205
Thinking of doing the same with current kitchen. How much roughly would it cost to have old kitchen taken down and put in place in garage. One wall of garage with salvageable presses, above and below plus existing counter top?
Any half competent DIYer could do that.
 

TrundleAlong

Registered User
Messages
146
+1 for that. Given the total money you're spending anyway, it's crazy to skimp on the flooring beneath the units.
Is there not a risk that when you get your new flooring in place, it could be damaged when the kitchen/cooker etc. is being installed?
 

TrundleAlong

Registered User
Messages
146
Our Stanley range cooker is both our cooker and central heating unit. It is also our radiator in the kitchen. If we take out our range cooker/heating unit and put in place a standard boiler I would imagine that we will need to have a new radiator installed in the kitchen?

Is it an easy job to install one radiator plus piping? The new radiator would be located on the opposite side of the kitchen to where the new boiler would be.
 

TrundleAlong

Registered User
Messages
146
Do I really need an extractor hood over my cooker? At the moment we have an extractor fan over our cooking area. We don't always use it when cooking. We propose getting in place a hood that doesn't vent externally. Carbon filter type of thing.

Do we really need either?
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
14,205
Do I really need an extractor hood over my cooker? At the moment we have an extractor fan over our cooking area. We don't always use it when cooking. We propose getting in place a hood that doesn't vent externally. Carbon filter type of thing.

Do we really need either?
If you're sticking with gas, you will need to be sure you maintain a sufficient source of fresh air to replace the oxygen consumed in the combustion, you should maintain external extraction to remove carbon dioxide.

If using electric hob, then the carbon filter extractors will remove much of the smells produced and make for a more pleasant environment. If you don't like the hood types, the downdraft ones now available work well if you can sacrifice some floor cabinet space by the hob.
 

Laramie

Registered User
Messages
486
We went for an induction hob recently after a lifetime of cooking on gas and fervently believing gas couldn't be beaten
Can you recommend a brand? I think we will change to an induction. Maybe 4 rings only. I am not sure if having a 5th ring is worth it?
 

Baby boomer

Registered User
Messages
739
Can you recommend a brand? I think we will change to an induction. Maybe 4 rings only. I am not sure if having a 5th ring is worth it?
Bosch. Neff, Bosch and Siemens are essentially the same products from the same company; just the badging, branding and style are different. We went for Bosch because we felt the controls were more intuitive and less fussy. Each brand has a similar range of products with minimal differences. I'd recommend one with flexizones that can be combined rather than fixed rings - handy if you want to use a griddle plate. I'd agree about the fifth ring - can't ever remember thinking we need an extra ring! We got one with integrated downdraft ventilation which rules out a fifth ring anyway. But if you're not going that route and you've got plenty space, yeah, maybe the fifth ring might be a good option.
 

Baby boomer

Registered User
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739
Does this mean that you can programme different rings to do different things? Would a person really need that?
It's not really programming - just toggling a setting. I find it very handy for bigger pots and pans. But yeah, not essential, more a nice-to-have.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
14,205
Does this mean that you can programme different rings to do different things? Would a person really need that?
The majority my not, but some who cook a lot and at times for larger numbers might. Think of all the sides some people like to prep for occasions like Christmas, an extra ring might just come in handy.
 
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