Kitchen remodel quote

Micks'r

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Just something to bare in mind, when Ophelia struck and we lost power for 8 days straight it was great to have a gas hob so that we could at least cook during the outage.
 

IsleOfMan

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When remodeling a kitchen is the flooring the last thing that gets done?

Not sure if we will get linoleum, tiles or wood. Do I run these to the skirting boards and put new presses on top or put presses in and then run flooring to edge of presses?
 

cloughy

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I would run floor full way, that way when next change if kitchen or even removing a unit there are no gaps. Obviously cost a little more but probably not a whole lot in grand scheme. This would mean floor first then kitchen to be installed i would assume.
 

Baby boomer

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I would run floor full way, that way when next change if kitchen or even removing a unit there are no gaps. Obviously cost a little more but probably not a whole lot in grand scheme. This would mean floor first then kitchen to be installed i would assume.
+1 for that. Given the total money you're spending anyway, it's crazy to skimp on the flooring beneath the units.
 

IsleOfMan

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+1 for that. Given the total money you're spending anyway, it's crazy to skimp on the flooring beneath the units.
Thanks. It's not about saving money. We were thinking linoleum as a floor covering.. I was concerned that the kitchen units might "pinch" the linoleum when the kitchen units are put on top?
We have an existing lino type floor that is glued to the ground. There is a pattern cut in to the lino, I think it is called a marmoleum flooring.


The pattern was individually glued on to the floor. So if you can imagine in places, the pattern pieces are coming away from the cement/screed floor underneath. They are loose in places.
When putting down a new linoleum floor, would it be possible to cover over the existing floor with a thin piece of wood and then put the new lino on top of this? So the old marmoleum floor, would be underneath the wood with the new covering on top. We would be going for a thicker new linoleum floor.

If not, we will have to take up the existing glued to the floor lino and in the process we would be taking away lumps of screed underneath. Then have to go to the trouble and mess of having a new screed put down. Is it any easy job to put a new screed on top of a concrete floor as a DIY job?

Or.....do we simply get a wood floor put down on top of the existing marmoleun floor? If we were to opt for tiles, would the tile cement be able to level out the dips in the existing floor caused by the removal of the marmoleum covering?
 

Monbretia

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When my kitchen was done lately the floor went in first and is under cabinets, not fully to the walls neatly, more of a rough edge but it does extend underneath and fully underneath island should it ever need to move although realistically unless it's tiles and even then sometimes it's discoloured where no light gets.

I had stuck down lino/vinyl, I got LVT vinyl tiles as apparently they don't stick vinyl anymore except around the edges and I did not want it 'loose' as it just looks bad eventually plus if a bit gets damaged you're screwed, I had marks on mine from people walking in my gravel driveway and stones getting stuck in their shoes and putting nicks in the vinyl, don't like hard tiles so went with the vinyl tile, more expensive than sheet vinyl but I love it and can replace a tile easily if damaged.

Anyway old floor covering had to come up which I did myself in stages, hard work but while they said they could glue the vinyl tiles over it if necessary my floor had a few lumps and bumps which annoyed me so got up the vinyl and they put a levelling compound all over the floor so it was beautifully smooth before tiling.
 

RedOnion

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If not, we will have to take up the existing glued to the floor lino and in the process we would be taking away lumps of screed underneath. Then have to go to the trouble and mess of having a new screed put down. Is it any easy job to put a new screed on top of a concrete floor as a DIY job?
The easiest thing would possibly be to pour a floor levelling compound on top of what's already there. But it really depends on the condition of it. Flooring specialists deal with this every day, so I'd suggest asking for ideas before you buy the new flooring.
 

Tintagel

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Would you choose a wood or laminate gloss style kitchen presses? Can laminate kitchens be bespoke? We have a few odd lengths and corners to deal with. Ta
 
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RedOnion

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Would you choose a wood or laminate gloss style kitchen presses?
I think this is very much personal choice. I'm not a huge fan of high gloss kitchens, but they can look very well in a modern kitchen.

Can laminate kitchens be bespoke?
Yes, but it depends on where you are buying. Somewhere like IKEA for example have pre determined sizes. But other suppliers can get them custom made to order.
I would suggest however this is where a good kitchen planner can really benefit. It's usually possible to use completely standard sizes to utilise an existing space.
 

Tintagel

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There is just the two of us at home. We already have a gas supply. Looking at different makes of gas hobs plus oven. I think a 4 ring, 60 wide would suffice. Any recommendations for a good reliable cooker?
 

RedOnion

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@Tintagel
Freestanding, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend Rangemaster, if their styles work with your kitchen. Had one, we moved house and I've bought another.
They're a little on the pricey side though; dual fuel 60cm is in the 800 - 900 bracket I think depending on model.

If you're doing other remodelling work with your kitchen and getting on in age, I'd strongly suggest you consider getting a built-in oven at eye level to avoid constantly bending down. I've yet to meet someone who's done it and regretted it.
 

Tintagel

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Freestanding, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend Rangemaster, if their styles work with your kitchen. Had one, we moved house and I've bought another.
They're a little on the pricey side though; dual fuel 60cm is in the 800 - 900 bracket I think depending on model.
Just looking at the Rangemaster as you posted. We like the look. The 60cm would suit us fine. Not too many stockists about though? Looking at the model with 4 gas rings on top, plus Grill below and then oven.

Two small people here. The standard oven probably suits better. Not to keen on stuff at eye level in case something spills or topples down on us as we take out of oven.
 

RedOnion

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Not too many stockists about though?
There are lots of stockists. They're custom ordered to your configuration as there are lots of options (colour, ring arrangement, etc).
DID, Harvey Norman, most Expert Electric, etc. all supply them.

I've got a Rangemaster Classic which is very traditional, but the Professional range is a bit more modern looking.

Official stockists can be found here:
 

Baby boomer

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Two small people here. The standard oven probably suits better. Not to keen on stuff at eye level in case something spills or topples down on us as we take out of oven.
Check out the Neff "Slide and Hide" ovens. (That's the one we have; other manufacturers may also have them.) Once the door opens fully, it slides away underneath the oven cavity. Gives the ideal position for taking stuff out at eye level, or just below, without having to reach over the open door. Much better (and safer) than bending down IMO.
 

RedOnion

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Check out the Neff "Slide and Hide" ovens.
Brilliant option. I got one of these for a relative who had managed to burn their arm a few times on the door of an older oven. Have it 3 years +, and they love it.

Not to keen on stuff at eye level in case something spills or topples down on us as we take out of oven.
Apologies, my use of "eye level" is misleading. You can get a built-in oven any height you want to suit when you're designing your kitchen.
 

Monbretia

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Actually on the 'eye level' oven I got the position of mine changed slightly when redoing the kitchen, it used to be a small tad too high I thought so I brought it down so that the base is level with the kitchen counter, much better for taking stuff out.
 
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