Kitchen remodel quote

Leo

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Replace marmoleum flooring. Existing flooring glued to concrete/screed. So will probably need to have new screed on floor. Do I need to remove old Marmoleum or can I just put new lino/wood floor on top of existing Marmoleum floor?
If nice and flat all over you can lay right over, you might not even need an underlay and so that approach would save time and money.
 

TrundleAlong

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There's tradesmen out there that can do all that work for you. However, you come across as someone who might not know many people in that business (I might be completely wrong) and they're almost impossible to get, very, very, much in demand. If you or your family are familiar with a builder, or similar, get them to quote for the job. The gas boiler installation will have to be done (signed off) by a properly registered person.
That's exactly why I have asked my questions.

Have you any recommendations?
 

IsleOfMan

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875
Do I need a builder if I am replacing an old kitchen?
Thinking of doing the same myself. We have gas cooking in our kitchen and gas central heating. Is it advisable to switch from gas cooking to electric cooking and just leave the central heating on gas?

The main reason is that we are reconfiguring our kitchen and moving our cooking area to the opposite side of the kitchen. I would imagine that connecting an electric supply to the new cooker would be a lot easier than running gas pipes to opposite side of kitchen.

Any thoughts or recommendations on this?
 

Baby boomer

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Any thoughts or recommendations on this?
We went for an induction hob recently after a lifetime of cooking on gas and fervently believing gas couldn't be beaten. Well, it can now. I never thought I'd say it but modern induction hobs beat gas hands down. Incredibly fast to heat up and just as responsive and powerful as gas. Much easier to keep clean too.

The ones with integrated downdraft vents are very impressive. You don't need a separate extractor fan, which is particularly handy if your hob is on an island or against an internal wall. A bit expensive, but in the context of a new kitchen, it gives you great flexibility in planning the layout.
 

Leo

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As above, many pro chefs are moving from gas to induction as main heat source. Induction hobs have addressed the controllability issues that previous electric heating elements couldn't with the added benefit of a much more pleasant environment. Induction hobs don't throw the majority off heat into the room, burn up significant amounts of oxygen, or produce lots of CO2. Cooler kitchen and better air quality, win-win.
 

Baby boomer

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Just be aware that induction hobs require induction pots/pans etc.
True, but the vast, vast majority of pots and pans are induction compatible. Look for the little symbol on the bottom of the pan before you buy to make sure. When we changed, we had only one pot, and that was a very old one, that wouldn't work on the new hob.
 

IsleOfMan

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875
Thanks. I think we have just the standard electric sockets in our kitchen. Do we need to get in place a higher quality cable for the induction hob and oven?
 

noproblem

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Seem to remember a debate not long ago about unhealthy radiation from induction hobs. Can't find it now.
 

IsleOfMan

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875
These will need their own dedicated circuit.
Does this involve running a new cable from the fuse box area to the location of the electric cooker? I am just trying to visualise how this will be done. Up and across the ceiling or behind the plasterboard? Our cable would need to turn ninety degrees at one point. Or can we just isolate one of our existing sockets in the kitchen as a stand alone socket for the cooker/hob?
 

Monbretia

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Just to add I did a kitchen revamp lately and I also had a gas hob, for sake of convenience I didn't move it as thought it would be major hassle with the pipes too, turns out it's no big deal anymore as they use plastic flexible pipe so easy to do behind presses for example, now if you want to get into the middle of the floor to an island then that would be different but I would have been just moving from one side of an L shape to another but left it anyway but if you're bringing power to the island that is not already there then I imagine it's a dig a channel in floor job anyway.

I like my gas hob :)
 

Leo

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Does this involve running a new cable from the fuse box area to the location of the electric cooker? I am just trying to visualise how this will be done. Up and across the ceiling or behind the plasterboard? Our cable would need to turn ninety degrees at one point. Or can we just isolate one of our existing sockets in the kitchen as a stand alone socket for the cooker/hob?
It's most likely that all your kitchen sockets are on a single circuit, all linked together and fed by a single cable back the the board. The hob will need a new feed with a larger diameter cable than is feeding sockets. Electricians are used to awkward wiring jobs like this, they will advise on the best route.
 

Monbretia

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I liked mine too, and thought I'd never go electric. But the newer induction hobs are the bees knees. Check them out!
I won't be changing it until this one breaks and it's fairly new :) Last one was working on just 2 rings for a long time, when it went down to one I gave in! Maybe it's my age and coming from a windy wild spot but the memories of power cuts are always in the back of my mind, even if no power I can cook a dinner :)
 

Baby boomer

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I won't be changing it until this one breaks and it's fairly new :) Last one was working on just 2 rings for a long time, when it went down to one I gave in! Maybe it's my age and coming from a windy wild spot but the memories of power cuts are always in the back of my mind, even if no power I can cook a dinner :)
Yeah, in fairness, that's the one downside. A gas hob gives you a backup. Still, the barbecue can be pressed into service if necessary I suppose! We won't starve:)
 

IsleOfMan

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875
Just to add I did a kitchen revamp lately and I also had a gas hob, for sake of convenience I didn't move it as thought it would be major hassle with the pipes too, turns out it's no big deal anymore as they use plastic flexible pipe so easy to do behind presses for example, now if you want to get into the middle of the floor to an island then that would be different but I would have been just moving from one side of an L shape to another but left it anyway but if you're bringing power to the island that is not already there then I imagine it's a dig a channel in floor job anyway.
That's interesting.

We will be taking out a gas range cooker that also doubles up as our boiler. It's 30 years old and coming to the end of it's life. Parts are becoming difficult to get. It was recommended that we upgrade our old range to a more modern range and continue on as before. Use it for cooking and as a boiler.
All the gas piping is in situ. We had planned to have a separate wall mounted standard boiler close to where our existing gas pipes are and move our cooking facilities to the other side of the room......but electric. It seems that it would be easier just to get another gas hob and oven in place where the existing pipes are....but only have it for cooking.

Still I feel that electric might be the way to go.
 
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