Kids driving lessons - leaving car in gear when at traffic lights.

Cervelo

Registered User
Messages
862
Would help a lot people reversing into car spaces.
I remember years ago when I had friends with cars and they were trying to reverse into to spaces more than a few times I had to say
"Stop what you're doing, Get out of the car and let me do the parking"
There is nothing more annoying when sitting in a car behind somebody who takes forever to reverse into a space especially the ones where the car doesn't fit but their going to do their damndest to make it fit :mad:
 

AlbacoreA

Registered User
Messages
3,921
True. I simply cannot understand why people do this though.
Because putting the rear wheels in first gives you superior manoeuvrability. But also better situational awareness. Unless the space is angled to be forwards only.

Reversing around a corner is useful training in any situation where your way forward is blocked. Not just parking.
 

Baby boomer

Registered User
Messages
739
If parking spaces are perpendicular to the road, you should reverse in if possible. Simply because you will be driving forwards when you're leaving the space and that's a lot safer than reversing into traffic.
So I was taught 45 years ago and it remains true today.

If the parking spaces are parallel to the road, then you reverse parallel park. It never ceases to amaze me that there are fully licensed drivers who haven't mastered this simple skill.
 

AlbacoreA

Registered User
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3,921
Most of the parking ease comes from positioning the non steering axle first. It's not subjective its physics or such.
 

PMU

Registered User
Messages
1,102
My daughter is doing driving lessons and I'm also bringing her out between lessons. One thing that she's doing - and is really annoying me - is that when she's stopped at traffic lights, she pulls the hand brake up and leaves the car in gear with the clutch down.
Another issue here is if the instructor has told your kid to cover the break pedal and the quickest way to do this is to already have your right foot just over the break. But if the instructor is focusing on speed of moving off, your kid is probably covering the accelerator. And in an emergency, e.g. a hit from behind, it just takes longer to move your foot from the accelerator to the break and depress it, than to depress the break when you are already covering it. Of course, your kid may have a super fast reaction time, but not everybody does. That's why the car should be in neutral, the handbreak on, and the driver's foot covering the break.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
13,982
True. I simply cannot understand why people do this though.
As above, when approaching a space you have the opportunity to observe all around to ensure it's safe to reverse in. and facing out means you don't have to contend with little visibility as to what's approaching from the sides.

Remember, if you're reversing out of a space and another driver who isn't paying attention hits you, it is you who will be deemed to be at fault.
 

Peanuts20

Registered User
Messages
688
I remember years ago when I had friends with cars and they were trying to reverse into to spaces more than a few times I had to say
"Stop what you're doing, Get out of the car and let me do the parking"
There is nothing more annoying when sitting in a car behind somebody who takes forever to reverse into a space especially the ones where the car doesn't fit but their going to do their damndest to make it fit :mad:
What's really annoying is when they reverse in and park so close to your drivers door that you can't open it. I had to get in my passenger seat a couple of weeks back, clamber over the gear stick to get into the drivers seat and I'm not a small guy. Plonker who'd parked next to me had plenty of room to tidy up how he had parked :mad::mad::mad:
 

RetirementPlan

Registered User
Messages
429
What's really annoying is when they reverse in and park so close to your drivers door that you can't open it. I had to get in my passenger seat a couple of weeks back, clamber over the gear stick to get into the drivers seat and I'm not a small guy. Plonker who'd parked next to me had plenty of room to tidy up how he had parked :mad::mad::mad:
True, but you don't know who or what was parked in the next space when he was parking.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
13,982
Is this actually true though? My instinct tells me it couldn't be?
Yeah, I once offered to be witness after seeing a similar incident. Lady had started reversing out of a space, about 1/3 of the way out before noticing an approaching car and stopped. I could see the driver of the other car was looking at an unfolded map spread across the steering wheel, he didn't even see her car and drove into it. He was quite apologetic on the scene admitting he was reading a map, and everyone assumed it was an open-shut situation and his insurance would cover everything. Lady rang me a couple of weeks later thanking me for offering to help but saying her insurance company informed her that they would be settling against her and this was standard practice as he had right-of-way. She said she had spoken to a friendly Garda who confirmed as much too.
 

Leper

Registered User
Messages
1,772
White lines in a carpark don't mean much to some motorists. Fortunately, the majority of motorists observe common sense and the obvious rules. But, there is an element who think they can park anywhere, any time they feel. Largely, they go unchallenged mainly because they know nobody is going to challenge them. That is the kind of people we are. We put up with the shortcomings of other drivers without as much as raising an eyebrow. We put up with people treble parked at schools in case their offspring will have to walk 20 metres more.

But, then there's me; fed up with turning the other cheek. Take up two parking spaces or park with no recognition of others and I'll park immediately next to you even if it means you cannot open your car door or leave the spot without hitting something. I have become merciless. You're stuck in that space until I feel like moving my humble car. I don't care who you are, where you're from, where you're going or if it's a BMW or a Panda you'll have to deal with me first.

. . . . and it makes me feel good!
 

T McGibney

Registered User
Messages
4,290
Yeah, I once offered to be witness after seeing a similar incident. Lady had started reversing out of a space, about 1/3 of the way out before noticing an approaching car and stopped. I could see the driver of the other car was looking at an unfolded map spread across the steering wheel, he didn't even see her car and drove into it. He was quite apologetic on the scene admitting he was reading a map, and everyone assumed it was an open-shut situation and his insurance would cover everything. Lady rang me a couple of weeks later thanking me for offering to help but saying her insurance company informed her that they would be settling against her and this was standard practice as he had right-of-way. She said she had spoken to a friendly Garda who confirmed as much too.
Not doubting you for a second, but if I were her, I'd have sought legal advice on the insurance company's decision here.
 

Leper

Registered User
Messages
1,772
I'm seeing another side of you, Dark Leper ;)
Was it Willie O'Dea said "It's never the wrong time to do the right thing"? - I've spent years putting up with motorists parked and blocking our front gate which prevents every member of our family driving in or out. Signs like "No Parking Please -, Gate in Use 24 hours" mean nothing to some. We live in a cul-de-sac and it is handy parking for anybody taking one of three bus routes leading to Cork's City Centre. Only last Friday morning a guy ran off when I asked him to move his car. He pretended he didn't hear me and vanished. Later our daughter couldn't enter the driveway so I parked her car within an inch of his front bumper. Mrs Lep returned later and couldn't enter the driveway either so I parked her car within an inch of the silly boy's back bumper. I went for my daily walk at circa 5.10pm and left a note on "aul stock's" windscreen for him to ring me which he did.

He rang and swore at me from a height - I had walked at least a mile and a half by then. When I sardonically said "I haven't heard an apology from you yet" he became more verbally aggressive. I asked him to cool down and ring me in another hour and if he were more civil he could be on his way after I returned. He had no choice and the cards were stacked in my favour. I don't think he'll block our driveway again.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
13,982
Not doubting you for a second, but if I were her, I'd have sought legal advice on the insurance company's decision here.
She may well have, but once you start the claim process, the insurance companies are entitled to settle as they chose. Looking at the legislation, you must yield to a car already travelling on a road, so reversing or driving into the path of another vehicle still puts you in the wrong.
 
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