Heat in Supermarkets/Banks etc.

WaterWater

Registered User
Messages
434
I was shopping in a supermarket in Blackrock, Dublin recently and I thought that I was going to faint because of the excessive heat. I had to leave Dunnes Stores Cornelscourt also, because it was so stuffy and hot.

Ulster Bank Blackrock, AIB Stillorgan are another two places where the heating is excessive.

Their utility bills must be very high.
 

odyssey06

Registered User
Messages
3,861
The staff are going around often in t-shirts.
People come in from the cold outside in heavy jackets.

Wear an old outer jacket you don't mind going awol and put it in your trolley.
Keep all your keys, phone etc on you. If you don't have enough trouser pockets, get a light gilet \ fleece that you can wear under the jacket, and walk around the shop in that.
 

DannyBoyD

Registered User
Messages
101
In countries where there are longer / colder winters, outer coats often have added straps on the inside; so the coat can be carried almost like a backpack when inside shopping centres etc.
 

Sue Ellen

Moderator.
Messages
8,620
This is why elderly people go and sit in shopping centres so they can be warm and not have to turn on the heat in their homes especially with fuel costing so much. See them regularly doing this and it is so sad but I suppose they possibly get to have a chat with others while there.
 

Bronco Lane

Registered User
Messages
485
I am just back from a visit to Vincent's Hospital and I had to take off my coat and jumper immediately I went inside.
As soon as I walk into St. Vincent's Hospital, I feel so claustrophobic because of the stifling heat. I hate the experience and the deeper you venture into the hospital the worse it gets.

If you visit Marks and Spencer in Blackrock, you have jets of hot air directed on to the top of your head. The Lidl store in Stillorgan is fine until you get to the checkout queue, then you have to stand under the hot air fans on full blast, presumably to keep their check-out staff warm.

Same with Ryanair planes during the winter months. Hot air and stuffy cabins. One of the reasons I never take an early morning flight because they pump hot air into the cabin before and during take-off.
 

Grizzly

Registered User
Messages
921
Wear an old outer jacket you don't mind going awol and put it in your trolley.
Keep all your keys, phone etc on you. If you don't have enough trouser pockets, get a light gilet \ fleece that you can wear under the jacket, and walk around the shop in that.
When visiting certain supermarkets, I have to plan what I will wear before my visit for that very reason. I usually leave most outer garments in my car. This won't work when in the city centre visiting a number of outlets.
 

noproblem

Registered User
Messages
3,292
In an AIB Bank this morning in a West of Ireland town. It was busy busy, night storage heaters had obviously been used but the funny thing was. Front door open, another door inside the front door had been wedged wide open to stay that way. Place would freeze you on one side and like a sauna on the other side. What an absolute waste.
 

SoylentGreen

Registered User
Messages
448
Same with Ryanair planes during the winter months. Hot air and stuffy cabins. One of the reasons I never take an early morning flight because they pump hot air into the cabin before and during take-off.
I agree. They pump hot air into the cabin to heat it up but then leave it on or forget to shut it off. If you are sitting on the runway waiting for take off, (at Dublin airport this is about 20 to 30 minutes taxiing) you are subjected to this oven like atmosphere. You see people reaching for the overhead vents turning them on in vain for a bit of fresh air.

At least with the mid-day flights the staff have worked up a bit of a sweat and prefer it a bit cooler. Hate it.
 

grenzgebiet

Registered User
Messages
82
Sue Ellen -
And we used to do the same in reverse in France during the summer - if things get too hot, just head for the nearest super-cooled Carrefours, especially the frozen-food section!
 
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