Green Card requirement for travel to BI / UK?

Germaine

Registered User
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20
Hi

Wonder if anyone knows more?

I heard a radio report on March 1st from the Motor Insurance Bureau of Ireland to contact your insurer and tell them if you require one. We travel North frequently with family there.

Allianz said no problem, we will pop a note on your policy and it will be posted out to you if it happens. Then they realised I had got my motor insurance with a broker so said contact your broker.

I contacted broker and she said its not a requirement and if brevet happens then you can call us back and request it.... I tried explaining what Allianz said she she got short with me asking for their name and position...? Can anyone advise?

My motor insurance is up for renewal in a few weeks anyway.....time to ditch the broker or give benefit of doubt in these uncertain times?

Cheers.
 

odyssey06

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1,612
Sounds like a mess... but just note that insurer can only issue green card up to your renewal date of your policy. You would be better off waiting until you have renewed.

ps no excuse for broker getting short with you, would think twice about renewing with them
 

PM9999

Registered User
Messages
40
The AA ( as a broker) seem to be arranging them automatically. We got this text last week:

UK Green Card: In the event of a no-deal Brexit, given your proximity to the Northern Ireland border, we will automatically send you a UK Green Card which will arrive in the post by 24th March. You don't need to contact us to request one but if you have any questions visit http://bit.ly/UK-Green-Card Thanks, The AA

Presumably, they will make some judgement before 24/3 as to the likelihood of a no deal Brexit.

Paul
 

Folsom

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189
Im somewhat perplexed and concerned about this 'green card'. What is it for? Or why is it needed? I assumed the CTA looked after affairs for crossing into UK.
 

RedOnion

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3,288
Im somewhat perplexed and concerned about this 'green card'. What is it for? Or why is it needed? I assumed the CTA looked after affairs for crossing into UK.
Its not a visa. Its proof that you are insured to drive in UK.
 

RedOnion

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3,288
Surely an insurance policy, displayed by an insurance disc and an irish registrated car would suffice, as is the case now?
You've heard of Brexit, right...?
Technically if there's no deal, the UK leaves the group of countries where the green card is not required.
 

Folsom

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189
You've heard of Brexit, right...?
Technically if there's no deal, the UK leaves the group of countries where the green card is not required.
Yes, and your point is what exactly?
Im talking about issuing this thing called a 'green card'.
For what purpose?
If I travel from Dundalk to Newry and have an accident in my car today, whether im insured or not will become apparent very quickly - without a green card.
So what will a green card achieve after Brexit that it has no requirement for today?
 

huskerdu

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2,138
So what will a green card achieve after Brexit that it has no requirement for today?
If the PSNI decide that foreign cars without it are impounded ( which they are entitled to under British law) , the card will be handy.
(No-one knows if they will do this, but they can)
 

Folsom

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189
If the PSNI decide that foreign cars without it are impounded ( which they are entitled to under British law) , the card will be handy.
(No-one knows if they will do this, but they can)
Yes, they could do that and in turn reciprocal measures will be adopted by Gardai for UK registered cars. Which all adds up to inconvenience and cost.
Alternatively, given the volume of IR/UK cars that cross over the border on daily basis, it would be more efficient if Irish reg and UK reg cars simply maintain their current status of being able to travel, fully insured, north and south of the border.
This 'green card' thing sounds like a load of Brexit bureaucratic nonsense.
 

huskerdu

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Yes, they could do that and in turn reciprocal measures will be adopted by Gardai for UK registered cars. Which all adds up to inconvenience and cost.
Alternatively, given the volume of IR/UK cars that cross over the border on daily basis, it would be more efficient if Irish reg and UK reg cars simply maintain their current status of being able to travel, fully insured, north and south of the border.
This 'green card' thing sounds like a load of Brexit bureaucratic nonsense.
I agree that its a "a load of Brexit bureaucratic nonsense" but that can be said of a lot of Brexit issues and that doesn't mean that we can ignore it.
It is a worst case scenario, but it would be foolish of us not to have any preparation for a worst case scenario , where possible.

Currently we don't know the exact practical ramifications of many aspects of Brexit, and I think sense will prevail on most practical issues.
Having said all that, driving a car abroad that does not meet the law in that country wrt insurance ( Even if the car is insured) is a serious offence but if I regularly drove to NI, I'd be inclined not to take a risk.
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,384
Alternatively, given the volume of IR/UK cars that cross over the border on daily basis, it would be more efficient if Irish reg and UK reg cars simply maintain their current status of being able to travel, fully insured, north and south of the border.
The green card is the international standard, it was around long before Brexit became a bad dream.

The current status is based on cross-EU recognition, once the UK leaves the EU, they leave that arrangement. They will need to negotiate a new reciprocal agreement with the EU, and that can only start once they're out. Who know's how long that might take, and UK & Irish authorities might choose to ignore the issue while a deal is trashed out, but in the meantime the green card will be required to be 100% compliant.

What might be more of an issue for some is the regulations around EU residents driving non-EU registered cars...
 

Folsom

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They will need to negotiate a new reciprocal agreement with the EU, and that can only start once they're out. Who know's how long that might take, and UK & Irish authorities might choose to ignore the issue while a deal is trashed out, but in the meantime the green card will be required to be 100% compliant.
I understand the point you are making and you are correct, but it appears apparent that under international standards the 'green card' is already in existence and in agreement. As another poster pointed out, the AA seem to be arranging them automatically. So there is no negotiation to be had on issuing the 'green card'?

What Im pointing out is that instead of issuing 'green cards' and drivers wondering if they are covered for tax and insurance if they haven't got one, that insurance companies and tax authorities automatically apply 'green card' status to all existing car tax and insurance policies registered in IRE and UK, for travel in Ireland, north and south of border. And to automatically apply that status upon renewal of those policies and for new policies.
 

Leo

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10,384
that insurance companies and tax authorities automatically apply 'green card' status to all existing car tax and insurance policies registered in IRE and UK, for travel in Ireland, north and south of border.
But that can't happen without the necessary legal frameworks being in place, and I certainly wouldn't trust the insurance industry to go above and beyond here in their customers' interests. As a consumer, I'd want to be sure that any insurance I'm relying on is reliable and won't leave me in the lurch should I need to avail of that cover in the event of an incident. My policy is pretty clear in that I'm not covered unless a mutual agreement is in place.
 

Folsom

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189
But that can't happen without the necessary legal frameworks being in place,
Apologies if im coming across as daft here, but my understanding is that the legal framework (the international standard) was already in place?
Im only taking into account the indo report attached above where, apparently, Axa Insurance tweeted "...all direct car and can customers will automatically receive a green card by post."
It would appear the legal framework already exists as you have suggested under the 'international standard'.
So instead of time-wasting, duplication, confusion, additional administration etc, the insurance industry and tax authorities on both sides of border simply issue a dictat that all car tax and insurance policies are entitled to have 'green card' status applied to them in the event of any prospective impounding.
Basically PSNI or Gardai or tax authorities then wont have any checks to do on any IR/UK registered cars for 'green card' status.
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,384
Apologies if im coming across as daft here, but my understanding is that the legal framework (the international standard) was already in place?
There are two options, you rely on a reciprocal agreement between the countries involved that eliminates the need to carry additional documentation, or you fall back on your insurance company explicitly providing coverage for that country, and issuing you with a green card to prove appropriate cover is in place. Once the UK leave the EU, they will no longer be covered under the EU mutual recognition legislation, so both parties will need to sign a new agreement. Until that happens, the fallback green card option is in effect.
 

Folsom

Frequent Poster
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189
Ok thanks, I got my head around it now (I think!).
Option 1 - Reciprocal agreement
This could form part of the WA, or subsequent trade agreement between EU and/or UK. Obviously, given the precarious political situation this does offer much confidence for drivers.

Option 2 - Insurance companies explicitly providing coverage.
This is more plausible in my opinion. A confirmation by the insurance giants Axa, Allianz, AIG etc that they will apply 'green card' cover for IR/UK reg vehicles travelling north and south should assure probably 90%+ of the market.
Only vehicles that are insured by corporations that dont have registered offices in one or other jurisdictions may have encounter difficulties.

In any case, thanks for explaining. If Brexit is causing confusion at this level, then it is going to reverberate across UK and EU economies for along time without a deal. Insurance is one area that will open a pandoras box of legal and political conflict in my opinion.
Might be a good idea to enter the legal €€€€ profession :)
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,384
Ok thanks, I got my head around it now (I think!).
Option 1 - Reciprocal agreement
This could form part of the WA, or subsequent trade agreement between EU and/or UK. Obviously, given the precarious political situation this does offer much confidence for drivers.
Yep, more likely to be a subsequent deal and just a matter of time, but with so many other issues to be trashed out, who knows when it'll get sorted. As above, my policy states that it provides coverage across the EU 'and any other country which has made arrangements to meet the minimum insurance requirements set by the European Union'. That gives them an opt out until such time as the EU/UK sign a deal, I just don't trust insurance companies not to exploit that in their favour.

Option 2 - Insurance companies explicitly providing coverage.
This is more plausible in my opinion. A confirmation by the insurance giants Axa, Allianz, AIG etc that they will apply 'green card' cover for IR/UK reg vehicles travelling north and south should assure probably 90%+ of the market.
Yep, and most of the insurance companies seem to be moving in this direction, though I think they have been dragging their heels a little in expectation of a delay in Brexit negotiations.
 
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