Grass downstairs and upstairs in old house.

Goobernub

New Member
Messages
4
Hello,

I am just looking for some opinion please.

I recently viewed an old house (definitely empty for the last 10 years, and I would imagine was built in/around 1930's).

When I viewed it, some windows were open upstairs (as they are broken). However, there was a path of grass throughout most of downstairs and in one of the back bedrooms there was more greenery.

Also, the ceiling looks like it would need to be completely done.

Just wondering if anyone would have any idea regarding where the grass is coming from and if it would be a major issue (potentially).

The structure of the house seemed fine (didn't see any cracks, and the walls didn't appear to be leaning etc - it's just quite an old house that hasn't been looked after).

Many thanks in advance,

Goobernub
 

Buddyboy

Frequent Poster
Messages
546
A 1930's house that hasn't been lived in for the last 10 years with broken windows. I'd say grass is the least of you problems.

I'd guess, grass seeds blew in through the open windows and the dampness in the house allowed the grass to take root. Especially if there was carpet or other material on the floors to help the roots establish.
 

Goobernub

New Member
Messages
4
Thanks Buddyboy - I was just wondering about the grass. The house itself is in a great location, hence why I went to view.

Thanks again...
 

Coldwarrior

Frequent Poster
Messages
170
The house is likely riddled with damp and dry/wet rot, I'd run a mile unless its priced at a very big discount compared to nearby properties and you have a very big budget available to renovate it.
 

Goobernub

New Member
Messages
4
Thanks Coldwarrior and Sue Ellen for your replies - I'm planning on doing figures up, but yes, the more I think about it, the more expensive it will be! Thanks again - appreciate the responses.
 

Buddyboy

Frequent Poster
Messages
546
I'd agree with Sue Ellen. Price it as a site, with the added cost of knocking and clearing the old house. This gives you a realistic estimate of what it is worth, and a starting point from which to add the cost of building a house on the site.

And be prepared to walk away, as there is always someone who gets rose tinted glasses and thinks it can be renovated cheaply.

On the other hand, It might be worth it if the location is what you are after, (the old adage of the three things most relevant to house prices still applies). And you will get planning permission (eventually :) ) as there is an existing house on the site.

Good luck.
 

Leo

Moderator
Messages
10,417
Bear in mind you may need to seek planning permission to bring it back into use as a dwelling, and that will entail bringing it up to modern building standards.
 
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