Fibre Broadband - Tree Obstacle and direct lines

odyssey06

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Having issues getting fibre broadband in a property in a Dublin estate.
The company have said they need to run cables from one side of the road to the property, but there are trees in the way and it's not 100% certain if they can trim them enough to allow the cable come through. Some of the other houses on the same stretch have cables going right through branches which seems a bit vulnerable.

I noticed that Virgin Media run their cables along the houses - so I can get broadband with them but I'd prefer to stick with current broadband provider as cheaper and quicker service, and long term fibre seems like it might be more scaleable than VM's offering.

Has anyone managed to get broadband via an indirect line run via neighbours or is it only direct?
 
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newirishman

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The installation team for fibre in my case did not entertain running the line via a neighbours property or wall.

In addition, I had to put the "hook" for running the cable myself, as they did not touch my house due to external insulation.
Once I did that (had some spots prepared in the insulation for exactly those purposes), they then told me they won't drill into the wall due to the insulation - so I would need to do that myself.
Also, be aware that apparently the *only* way the provide fibre is by putting the fibre media converter directly where there cable comes in (so no running of the fibre cable inside the house anywhere), and finally, the modem must be next to the fibre media converter as well. The converter must sit on an outside wall therefore as well.

Also, you need 2 power sockets close to the hole-in-the-wall for the fibre cable. (one for converter, one for modem)

The installer teams essentially don't do anything but the most straightforward installations. Given that the fibre can be used by any of half a dozen providers, it looks like there is no incentive to do anything else.
 

odyssey06

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Thanks @newirishman the property doesn't have external insulation, it has an enclosed porch which might complicate things. Virgin Media seem much more willing to run cables and drill multiple access points if needed. Hmm.
 

Blackrock1

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If you can only get virgin media you will have no scope to get better pricing, friend of mine pays 70 a month for 200mb BB whereas i change fibre provider annually and get 500mb for around 30-35 euro i think it is.
 

odyssey06

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.
If you can only get virgin media you will have no scope to get better pricing, friend of mine pays 70 a month for 200mb BB whereas i change fibre provider annually and get 500mb for around 30-35 euro i think it is.
Yeah that's a concern for sure... I wasn't expecting this issue in a built up Dublin suburb. In a stretch of 6 houses, 4 are impacted.
 
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newirishman

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If you can only get virgin media you will have no scope to get better pricing, friend of mine pays 70 a month for 200mb BB whereas i change fibre provider annually and get 500mb for around 30-35 euro i think it is.
VirginMedia provides some reduction for existing customers, if you call them (not as good a deal as new customers, mind).
Paying 56 euro now (instead of 71) for the 500Mb Broadband (in Dublin).
 

newirishman

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Thanks @newirishman the property doesn't have external insulation, it has an enclosed porch which might complicate things. Virgin Media seem much more willing to run cables and drill multiple access points if needed. Hmm.

The most annoying for me was that they seem to have only *one* type of fibre converter, and they only take feed directly from the wall behind. Also, no support for PoE so you need a socket - which is really a pain. With PoE you could at least put the router wherever it makes most sense, and just run a patch cable between them.
The issue with the fibre cable is that it is less flexible, and "easily" damaged by an enthusiastic DIY'er - and impossible to repair without the correct equipment and a quite bit of training.
Also, a fibre splitter is much more complicated than splitting a coax cable.
COAX cable OTOH is pretty much impervious to damage. Also, if it breaks, you can replace parts or fix it easily.
 
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nest egg

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The most annoying for me was that they seem to have only *one* type of fibre converter, and they only take feed directly from the wall behind. Also, no support for PoE so you need a socket - which is really a pain. With PoE you could at least put the router wherever it makes most sense, and just run a patch cable between them....
Using a PoE splitter/injector with the Fibre ONT works perfectly.
 
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