Coughs and Sneezes spread diseases/Cover your mouth when coughing.

Discussion in 'Letting Off Steam' started by Laramie, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. Laramie

    Laramie Frequent Poster

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    I cannot get over the number of ignorant and bad mannered people walking around supermarkets/banks and other public places, coughing in to the air, over food, over other people etc
    Today I was behind a woman in a Stillorgan bank. She just coughed over the person in front of her. She was wiping her wet nose with her hand. When she got to the counter she was handling the pen, pressing the keypad etc.
    Do these people think that their germs are special or something?
     
  2. Sunny

    Sunny Frequent Poster

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    Was in the supermarket the other day and a woman starting coughing and sneezing into her hands at the checkout. My 3 year old told her that she was doing it wrong. That she was supposed to cover with your arm and not your hand and proceeded to show her how it was done. I was very proud of her.......

    To be fair, I am sure I am guilty of it sometimes as well.....
     
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  3. odyssey06

    odyssey06 Frequent Poster

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    Too many people out and about who should be at home taking it easy... I see it at work, people coming in playing the martyr ensuring everyone in their vicinity is exposed to whatever they have.

    If you have to be out and about at least show some cop on to your situation and cover your emissions!
     
  4. Bronco Lane

    Bronco Lane Frequent Poster

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    I couldn't agree more. People of all ages happy to spread their germs. One of the reasons why I only purchase foodstuffs in packaging that I cannot wash.
    I saw a man coughing and sneezing over his own child who was sitting in his supermarket trolley. You wonder how someone could actually do this. Completely unaware.
    A visitor to our house over the Christmas sneezed in to his napkin, blew his nose and then left the napkin on the table beside food.
    An in law who gives a big cough then AFTER the cough puts his hand to his mouth, taps his chest and says excuse me. Not much point putting your hand to your after the event.
    The problem is that it is getting worse out there. The unawares are winning.
     
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  5. mathepac

    mathepac Frequent Poster

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    and turning into "don't cares" in the process. I saw a woman rooting through the unpackaged croissants the other day, using both hands. Despite touching everything in the storage bin, she bought nothing; neither did I.
     
  6. IsleOfMan

    IsleOfMan Frequent Poster

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    I have seen people pick up fruit and touch them to their nose to give them a "smell" then put them back when the smell was not what they wanted.
    Also check out assistants cough in to their hands and handle the unwrapped items that I have just purchased. Difficult for them but maybe a packet of disinfectant wipes should be provided by the shop owners.
     
  7. Leper

    Leper Frequent Poster

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    The Irish Examiner must be the dirtiest newspaper in Ireland. Everybody in Cork takes the 2nd newspaper from the top of the bundle and not touching the topmost before payment. I wonder why nobody ever takes the topmost copy.

    . . . . and at the Deli Counter it is not unusual to hear a Cork customer say "Take the first two slices off and I'll take the 3rd and 4th slice." But, in defence of that customer I have seen operatives at Deli Counters pick meat from the top of several bundles for male customers.

    . . . . and over to the check-out tills the coughing and sneezing continue (mainly from customers). No wonder our Accident and Emergency facilities are overcrowded.

    . . . . and the office martyr suffering from the winter vomiting bug the day before, comes to work to ensure everybody else suffers the same fate. While they're at it, they bring in turkey, ham, spiced beef leftover on worktops since Christmas Day.

    . . . . and let's take the dogs for a walk nightly. Don't bring a doggy soil bag though. Let the little mutt perform everywhere - sure isn't my little Ruby (the dog) as clean as the Vatican?

    . . . . I think we all should be dead by February.
     
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  8. odyssey06

    odyssey06 Frequent Poster

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    There really should be signs up in workplaces... if you have vomiting bug, even if you have stopped vomiting you need to wait 24 hours before returning to work as you are still shedding the virus during this period.
     
  9. johnwilliams

    johnwilliams Frequent Poster

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    "you need to wait 24 hours before returning to work as you are still shedding the virus during this period."
    i agree problem is you don't work you don't get paid
     
  10. mathepac

    mathepac Frequent Poster

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    I was in M&S in Clonmel recently, querying the availability of a product in that particular shop. They had a nice lavender-scented sanitising-gel on the counter next to the tills. Available to all, staff and customers alike, only staff members and I used it after using our hankies. The great unwashed, whether coughing into their bare hands, honking into hankies etc ignored the thoughtfully placed germ-killer.
     
  11. Tintagel

    Tintagel Frequent Poster

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    I cannot understand how people still use "hankies". They carry these filthy germ ridden, soiled pieces of cloth around in their pocket and then dump them in the washing machine, along with all the other clothes to be cleaned. To see someone blow in to a hankie and then flip the hankie to blow in to the clean side...turns my stomach.
     
  12. mathepac

    mathepac Frequent Poster

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    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
    Hankies are the new green, in every sense, the clean alternative to disposable paper tissues, which like plastic cups & bottles, plastic nappies and plastic bags are choking the plant to death and consuming raw-materials that could be used for more permanent purposes.

    In my house, hankies don't go in the wash with other clothes to be "cleaned" at 30 or 40 degrees, they go into a high temp wash with face-cloths and the like at 90 degrees using plain old soda crystals instead of expensive detergent and white vinegar as a rinse aid/ fabric softener. Any germs that resist that treatment are worthy of the title super-bug! High-temp washes and white vinegar rinses also help keep the washing machine clear of accumulated crud, germs and lime build up.

    Whether one uses hankies or paper tissue, they invariably go back into the pocket or handbag after a single use. Throwing paper tissues in the dustbin (or out the car window with the fag butts) does the very modern technological and hygienic thing of passing the disposal problem onto someone else. Flushing them down the toilet blocks sewers as unlike toilet tissue, paper hankies and kitchen paper are made to resist breaking down in contact with liquids.

    Hankies every time, linen or cotton.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
  13. Leper

    Leper Frequent Poster

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    "Hankies are the new green, in every sense, the clean alternative to disposable paper tissues, which like plastic cups & bottles, plastic nappies and plastic bags are choking the plant to death and consuming raw-materials that could be used for more permanent purposes."

    Oh! My Good God, seeing parents return to cloth nappies . . . . . . . I can't wait to see the reaction. Section 8 Repeal will have nothing like it. I know one lady who is dreaming of return to cloth nappies for her grandchildrens' use like the Spaniards are pining for the return of Franco.

    OK, Mathpac, you have me converted. Prepare the buckets, the napisan, the nappy liners (cloth, of course), terylene cloth nappies, that softer Domestos stuff, the smell, the disposal, . . . . . . . . Mathepac, I think the Gardaí will be calling to you informing you your life is in danger from at least half the population, sorry . . . . seven eights of the population including grandparents. Cleaner environment my hat!
     
  14. Laramie

    Laramie Frequent Poster

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    Every time you put your hand back in to your pocket to take out your hankie, you handle the germ covered item. So your hands end up covered in your germs.
    All recommendations are to use a paper tissue and dispose of it.

    I don't think you can equate a paper tissue to a plastic bottle.

    Are you the person who handles the hankie when putting it in the washing machine?
     
  15. Andarma

    Andarma Frequent Poster

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  16. mathepac

    mathepac Frequent Poster

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    Made no mention of them, just the plastic version which apparently is an alternative, but not a green one, as safe disposal is just passed on.
    All recommendations from whom? Paper-makers, medics, councils, rubbish tip managers?
    I did exactly that because just like plastic bottles and plastic nappies, paper hankies are designed not to break down on contact with liquids. You did read my post of course.
    It depends on whose turn it is to do the washing, mine or the dog's!
     
  17. IsleOfMan

    IsleOfMan Frequent Poster

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    https://www.irishtimes.com/sponsore...th-common-winter-illnesses-yourself-1.3365395

    "What you can do to protect others: Don’t cough or sneeze over people. Use a tissue and bin it. And wash your hands immediately afterwards to stop the virus spreading."

    There is actually an advert running on the radio at the moment telling people to use tissues.

    Do all the handkerchiefs and facecloths sit in a basket somewhere waiting to be washed or do you do an individual wash for each handkerchief?
     
  18. mathepac

    mathepac Frequent Poster

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    You do realise that the content on the Irish Times website you link to is an advertorial which immediately begs the question, "what are the sponsors selling?"

    Binning disposable hankies to lie around in public is the dirty, lazy option, possibly passing on "germs" to passers-by and the ultimate disposers, or even leaving the publicly accessible bin itself contaminated. My way the only two at risk are me and my dog.

    Like the Irish Times advertiser points out, colds and flus are caused by viruses. A virus needs a living host to survive, grow and replicate. So far over the years, I can attest to the fact that my modus operandi with real hankies has failed to infect my doggy with cold or flu viruses. And vice versa. I can produce confirmatory letters from our vets and doctors if necessary.
     
  19. cremeegg

    cremeegg Frequent Poster

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    Please
     
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  20. Purple

    Purple Frequent Poster

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    The flu virus only lives for about 15 minutes on a tissue, less time on your hands.