Central Bank: No evidence vulture funds treat home owners worse than banks

Discussion in 'Housing and mortgage arrears - policy issues' started by Brendan Burgess, 13 Nov 2018.

  1. Brendan Burgess

    Brendan Burgess Founder

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    There was a report on the radio today which seemed to suggest that it is easier to get deals from vulture funds than from banks. But I may have misheard it.

    I suspect that they were referring to this report in the Examiner.

    Vulture funds to avoid tougher regulations despite arrears review

    Overall, the review for the minister found that for borrowers who engage with mortgage arrears process, the code is working “effectively”. Moreover, there is no evidence borrowers whose situations have not changed are being moved off their current loan arrangements by unregulated entities.

    The review of the code of conduct on mortgage arrears (CCMA) included a discussion with consumer groups, state agencies as well as Central Bank inspections of credit firms as well as one bank. The Central Bank also looked at data relating to unregulated loan owners (ULOs) and whether they were active in repossessions.


    The Central Bank has committed to the minister to continue to monitor the use of the code, unregulated lenders such as vulture funds and they will track how borrowers are being treated.
     
  2. Brendan Burgess

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    Last edited: 13 Nov 2018
    I have attached the two pages of Key Findings. Here is the full report:

    https://www.finance.gov.ie/wp-conte...x-A-20181019-Section-6A-CCMA-Report-Final.pdf

    Minister Donohoe welcomes publication of the Review of the Code of Conduct on Mortgage Arrears


    Code deemed to be working effectively and as intended for borrowers who engage with the process


    Earlier this year, in March, arising from concerns in relation to loan sales, the Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure & Reform, Paschal Donohoe TD, requested the Central Bank of Ireland, under Section 6A of the Central Bank Act, 1942 (as amended), to carry out a review of the Code of Conduct on Mortgage Arrears (CCMA) to ensure it remains as effective as possible.


    The key finding of the Report is that for borrowers who engage with the process, the CCMA is working effectively and as intended in the context of the sale of loans by entities regulated by the Central Bank*.

    The Central Bank will continue to assertively supervise regulated firms' compliance with the Code and will track how long and short-term arrangements are being applied to borrowers over time.


    Although strategy, commercial decisions and contractual rights of entities regulated by the Central Bank cannot be interfered with, the Central Bank has committed to investigating any patterns of behaviour it becomes aware of that suggest the CCMA is not being followed. It will engage with industry on providing more information to borrowers on the assessment of their case and the reasons why arrangements considered, and not offered to the borrower, are not appropriate and not sustainable for the borrower’s individual circumstances. Consequently, the Central Bank is not proposing any changes to the Code of Conduct on Mortgage Arrears in the immediate future.


    Minister Donohoe said: ‘I would like to thank the Central Bank for its detailed and comprehensive Report on the effectiveness of the Code of Conduct on Mortgage Arrears in the context of the sale of loans by regulated lenders. I am glad to see, in this instance, that the Central Bank is satisfied that, for borrowers who engage with the process, the Code of Conduct on Mortgage Arrears is working effectively and as intended’.


    “I note that, as a result of its review, the Central Bank is not proposing any changes to the Code at the moment. However, as the Government and I take matters regarding mortgage arrears very seriously, we are always prepared to make changes and support actions where the Central Bank thinks they are necessary.”




    Ends

    Note to Editors:

    *Findings:

    • The key finding of the Report is that for borrowers who engage with the process, the CCMA is working effectively and as intended in the context of the sale of loans entities regulated by the Central Bank

    More generally:

    • The Mortgage Arrears Resolution Process (MARP), as set out in the CCMA, provides a clear framework for borrowers in or facing mortgage arrears on their primary residence to engage with relevant regulated entities, including banks, Retail Credit Firms and Credit Servicing Firms.
    • Both regulated lenders and Credit Servicing Firms (acting on behalf of Unregulated Loan owners) continue to put in place arrangements for borrowers who engage with this process.
    • There is no evidence that the Credit Servicing Firms inspected did not seek to engage with borrowers in arrears. The inspected Credit Servicing Firms have frameworks in place to support engagement with borrowers in arrears, as required by the CCMA. The Central Bank did not identify any material breaches of the CCMA by these firms.
    • Where a loan is sold to a Non-banking Fund (Unregulated Loan Owner), existing arrangements with borrowers are honoured by Retail Credit Firms and Credit Servicing Firms (acting on behalf of a Unregulated Loan Owner) until the agreed term of the arrangement comes to an end. Borrowers may then be offered a different arrangement from the suite of arrangements considered by the Retail Credit Firms and Credit Servicing Firms (acting on behalf of the Unregulated Loan Owner), within the MARP framework.
    • There is no evidence that borrowers whose circumstances have not changed are being moved off existing arrangements by Credit Servicing Firms (acting on behalf of the Unregulated Loan Owner) during the term of the arrangement.
    • Based on the number of properties taken into possession by banks, Retail Credit Firms and Unregulated Loan Owners over the period Q1 2016 to end Q1 2018, there is no material difference in the level of repossession activity by Unregulated Loan Owners compared with regulated lenders.
     

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    Last edited: 13 Nov 2018
  3. Brendan Burgess

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  4. Brendan Burgess

    Brendan Burgess Founder

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  5. Brendan Burgess

    Brendan Burgess Founder

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    In order to further compare the arrangements being put in place by
    regulated lenders and ULOs, the Central Bank gathered data to specifically
    examine the arrangements put in place in the nine quarters from Q1 2016
    to end Q1 2018. Some 68,500 arrangements have been put in place for
    borrowers in arrears or pre-arrears by all institutions during this period. It
    is clear that banks, RCFs and ULOs continue to restructure PDH mortgage
    loans.



    upload_2018-11-13_16-40-14.png
     
  6. Brendan Burgess

    Brendan Burgess Founder

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