New carpet won't allow door to close, reluctant to shave door.

Discussion in 'Homes and gardens' started by Noilheart, Jul 23, 2010.

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  1. Noilheart

    Noilheart Frequent Poster

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    I've just had new carpet fitted with thick underlay - but as soon as fittter had left and I went to close sitting room door i realised carpet is too high and the door had to be forced hard to close. I rang T.C. Matthews straight away and they said I'll have to get the door shaved - I am reluctant to do this as it's a really old door. I have placed piles of books on the carpet hoping it will flatten down. Has anyone had this problem I'd like to know? and what to do about it. I'm a bit annoyed that they didnt point this out to me as they should have known. thanks.
     
  2. GarBow

    GarBow Frequent Poster

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    Just plane the bottom of the door or remove the underlay in that section. It's not the fitters fault but he should have mentioned it if he knew.
     
  3. Padraigb

    Padraigb Frequent Poster

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  4. rustbucket

    rustbucket Frequent Poster

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    Honestly shaving the bottom of the door is the easiest thing to do. Only takes a few minutes once the door is off.You can buy an electric planer for about 30 quid. Handy thing to have in the house anyway if you are DIY inclined. You probably only need to take a couple of mm off
     
  5. Welfarite

    Welfarite Frequent Poster

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    Not really. The person who should have known is you! Why blame the carpet fitter? He's only fitting the carpet that YOU bought.You know (or should have checked)the clearance levels of the doors. Get annoyed with yourself! ;)
     
  6. Noilheart

    Noilheart Frequent Poster

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    GarBow; Rustbucket: Your comments are noted and I will consider this further, but the downside of this is the carpet is so high I think a lot would need to be planed off the door and it would be too high above the saddle board then, appearance would be spoiled plus draughts would blow under.
    PadraigB: Rising butt hinges sound interesting, haven't heard of them till now, but I dont want to change the working of the door as it is a lovely 85-year old door, it would be different from the other doors in the hallway then.
    Welfarite: Your comments are unhelpful. While I have every sympathy with hard-working carpet layers etc I am not the expert here, this is only the second carpet I have bought in my entire life (also for the same room) and the problem did not occur with the first carpet as the underlay was thinner. Yes I am annoyed that I trusted them to measure my house and sell me a suitable floor covering. T.C. Matthews are selling carpets every day of the week, they were the ones who measured my house, they were the ones who were in the sitting room laying the carplet while I waited outside to hand over my 1000 euro to them. They should have foreseen the problem This money was paid in full to them, none of it was counterfeit or defective in any way, they can use is straight away without any impediment, while I am left without the full use of my sittingroom and with the extra cost and time loss of sorting out this problem.

    Do ye think it would work if I got the underlay remove from under the door span and have thinner underlay put in there (T.C. Matthews salesman said this would leave a hollow at the door end) or should I go for changing to a thinner underlay for the whole room.
     
  7. donee

    donee Frequent Poster

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    dont buy any tools you wont use again,
    better to pay a professional ie a carpenter, €30 to plane the door properly.:)
     
  8. BillK

    BillK Frequent Poster

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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
    Like PadraigB, I'd go for rising butts.We have them on every internal door in the house and they make life much easier if you need to take a door off for moving furniture etc from room to room or for decorating. Much easier to paint a door that's lying flat.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  9. iWill

    iWill Registered User

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    There are several answers to your problem. But, first, why did it arise in the first place? You chose a carpet you felt will look good, feel good, and which will last for a reasonable amount of time in the area you chose (there are different grades of carpet for different areas of the home). Here, your responsibility, apart from funding the purchase, ends. From there on, responsibility for ensuring your purchase is suitable for fitting in the area in which you choose, and that it is fitted securely without causing problems with the existing infrastructure of you home rests with the supplier/fitter of the carpet. End of story.

    Now, to resolve the matter, you must contact the supplier or fitter. They have seen the problem first-hand, will already know about it and must correct it without delay. They should have used their professional experience and/or knowledge to ensure the carpet didn't cause problems and that it wasn't trapping any doors opening onto the carpeted area. Because the fitter will, presumably, have had to close the door to fit the carpet, he/she (I'm not sexist) will have had to force the door over the section of carpet which is trapping the door in order to open it, so, already, they will have caused some damage to this carpet.

    The most logical solution is to trim the bottom of the door so that it opens easily. I don't feel there is need to worry about draughts, because the amount removed is very small and will not be noticeable. The supplier should arrange this remedy at no expense to yourself, but you should ensure they use a qualified carpenter and that they know what they are doing.

    The suggestion of using rising butt hinges is completely impractical. Certainly, they will do the job of clearing the carpet, but they also will not allow the door to remain open unless you use a doorstop.
     
  10. Noilheart

    Noilheart Frequent Poster

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    I am considering all your replies, thanks, its very helpful.

    Iwill: thank you for pointing out that the people measured the room and sold me the carpet have fallen short on their customer service standards. After all goods should be suitable for the purpose for which they are intended.

    Will post whatever solution i chose, let you all know how it goes.
     
  11. Padraigb

    Padraigb Frequent Poster

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    Really?
     
  12. iWill

    iWill Registered User

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    Impractical, yes.

    For this reason: The carpet is trapping the door near its point of closure, as I understand the problem. Rising butt hinges are at their highest point when the door is at the fully open position, and at their lowest point when at the closed position. That is how rising butt hinges work; the weight of the door pressing upon the lower section of the hinges causes the door to close (unless, of course, it's held open by a door stop or other object). It is obvious, therefore, no height advantage is gained at the area where the carpet is trapping the door by using this type of hinge. If the carpet were trapping the door near its point of being fully open, then, yes, rising butt hinges would be a solution. For this reason, your suggestion, in the circumstances, is completely impractical.

    Noilheart: It certainly is obvious that the supplier/fitter have fallen far short in their provision of customer service. It is customer's meek acceptance of shoddy service which has caused the culture of trader's inadequate service to be the norm in Ireland.
     
  13. fizzelina

    fizzelina Frequent Poster

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    Noilheart, with all respect you are being so OTT, I got carpets with the same supplier, I shaved a few mm off the bedroom door as the plush carpet and underlay didn't allow it to close properly. It was my decision to get that carpet, like it was yours. You could have chosen one that would not be raised so high. Shave a few mm off this old door, it will not affect its appearance. And BTW in this case the carpet is fit for its purpose, you have no reason to say it is not. You won't the first person to shave a few mm off a door after buying a carpet.
     
  14. Leo

    Leo Moderator

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    Unfortunately for you, iwill is off the mark here. The carpet fitters are not responsible for anything other than fitting the carpet as per the contract. Check the terms & conditions you agreed to.


    Should all carpet fitters be 'qualified carpenters' or bring one along to each job for occasions where this issue arrises?
     
  15. iWill

    iWill Registered User

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    I really am surprised people here believe a carpet fitter should simply fit a carpet in an area which leaves his customer unable fully to close the room door, removing a function which existed before he started the work!

    Yes, I believe a carpet supplier/fitter should ensure the carpet does not have this effect on the customer. Whether they provide a 'qualified carpenter' basically is irrelevant; what is relevant is that the customer not be taken advantage of, which, clearly, has happened here.

    Note to self; Don't criticise the messenger – they might not want to hear the message!
     
  16. David_Dublin

    David_Dublin Frequent Poster

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    What I'd take out of this is not to pay fully for a service or piece of work until you are fully happy with whatever it is you have had done. I have been stung in the past - somethign not 100% complete, or not done with the care I think it should have been done with. Once you have paid you're in a much weaker position. I know it is too late now, and not too helpful a post, but if people carefully inspect whenever they get things done before they pay, things like this are avoided. I imagine that the seller and/or fitter would be more inclined to be involved in the solution if they were owed money.

    In this scenario I can see both sides of the argument. It is really annoying when you pay good money to a reputable company to get something done, and something comes up that must come up all the time, and they neither warn you in advance, nor assist with resolving it. It should and could have been avoided. Though it's a little unfair to blame the actual fitter himself.

    Your issue seems to be that shaving the door will leave a gap between the bottom of the door and the saddle, with draught and aesthetic issues resulting. Maybe the saddle could be raised a little to close the gap, as someone pointed out, you're only talking milimetres. You are looking at a carpenter though, best get a professional to do the job.
     
  17. Pique318

    Pique318 Frequent Poster

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    Sheesh...no-one's to blame for their own decisions any more :rolleyes:
     
  18. Grizzly

    Grizzly Frequent Poster

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    Noilhart, earlier in the year purchased a carpet for the hall, stairs and landing. From previous posts/threads it appears that decorating etc is something done on a regular basis in her home so I would suggest that Noilhart ask practical questions next time she makes a purchase rather than asking "what is fashionable".
     
  19. Noilheart

    Noilheart Frequent Poster

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    Hi Leo , I had already checked the conditions of sale at time of paying the deposit = they were on the on the back of docket I was given; there is nothing there relating to my situation as regards the door. I agree with iWill that the supplier should have flagged this as they did the measuring, out of simple courtesy at the least. I then could have had the choice to go for the thinner underlay or the lower density carpet or whichever combination of underlay/carpet fitted similarly to my existing carpet and which would have allowed the door to open and close.


    David Dublin –ah yes... I actually took the day off work to be there in case any problems arose and I checked in with the fitters when they had laid the underlay and then when they were half way through and they said everything was grand. You're right about not paying out all the money, but the thing is I did check when they were finished and everything appeared grand, the door wide open, I asked how it went etc and they never said a word about the door. I paid up the money. As the van drove off I went to close the door feeling pleased with the lovely carpet and that's when I got the unpleasant surprise. I didn't think of raising the saddleboard up to meet the shortened door, that's a new idea.


    Pique 318: have to disagree with you there, I think the carpet seller/measurer is to blame for their decision to sell this carpet for t his particular combination of underlay/carpet for this particular room.


    Grizzly, has researched my previous posts, not with a view to contributing positively to the discussion, but in order to make a “ put-down” remark to “her”. I don't think Grizz will gain any medals for his research abilities as he has reached an incorrect conclusion.
    As I posted earlier this is only the second carpet I have ever bought and while I made enquiries earlier in the year about carpet design for my hall, I did not purchase a carpet at that time, yet Grizzly feels free to announce “Noilhart, earlier in the year purchased a carpet for the hall” .
    I suggest he researches the posting guidelines and pays attention to guideline number 19 and then he might become fashionably practical in his response to my original post.
     
  20. IsleOfMan

    IsleOfMan Frequent Poster

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    In fairness you did say that you stayed in a YWCA in Los Angeles in a previous post? :D

    Back to carpets. I have a very dark green turquoise carpet, made by Munster Carpets on my hall stairs and landing. I actually find that it does not show the dirt as compared to a lighter carpet. I have a hand held carpet sweeper that I can run over any light coloured crumbs etc

    It is actually easier to keep than a sawgrass coloured carpet that shows all the dirt.
     
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