integrated oven/hob installation

Discussion in 'Homes and gardens' started by showmedmoney, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. showmedmoney

    showmedmoney Frequent Poster

    Posts:
    30
    hello all,


    I am in the process of installing an integrated oven and hob,

    The hob arrived with no plug/wire.

    I was just wondering should connect the hob with a standard. i.e like a hair dryer, wire and plug and connect to a nearby socket.

    the builders left a single heavy duty cable connected directly to mains, i will be contecting this to the oven

    any feedback would be great

    thanks
    -stephen
     
  2. edenjohnny

    edenjohnny Frequent Poster

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    101
    the hair drier connectiomn will not do I suggest get an electrician if you do not know what to do . Your house could be at risk PLAY SAFE.
     
  3. Leo

    Leo Moderator

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    6,463
    Both should be connected to the heavy duty cable. Please note that these appliances pull a lot of power, poor workmanship on making these connections could pose a serious risk of electrocution or fire. If you're not 100% sure of what you're doing, please get in the pros.
    Leo
     
  4. showmedmoney

    showmedmoney Frequent Poster

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    30
    is it standard procedure to plug heavy cable into a normal socket
     
  5. qwerty?

    qwerty? Frequent Poster

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    126
    Is the Hob electric or gas, a gas hob is plugged into a normal socket, as it only needs power for the sparkers. If you aren't to clear on how to wire a cokker, I'd suggest you get an electrician aswell, as no point in fitting the oven yourself, and risking it or your house going on fire.
     
  6. Leo

    Leo Moderator

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    6,463
    Nope, should never happen. A hob alone can draw more than 13A with just two rings in use.
     
  7. Carpenter

    Carpenter Frequent Poster

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    2,629
    Sounds like showmedmoney should consult an electrician or competent person to make the connection. It is normal practice to run the heavy cable to the hob where a spilt block is provided to allow another (slightly lighter) cable to be run to the oven. The load for a domestic cooker can be up to 30amps (or more) and this isn't really a job for an amateur.
     
  8. showmedmoney

    showmedmoney Frequent Poster

    Posts:
    30
    Ok,

    Thanks for the replies so far,

    if the socket is out for the electric hob, then the builder should have left me 2 mains cables to work from.

    can i use the 1 which is present and put some sort of conection so that i will have 2 outputs.

    Ps cant connect up in serial mode because the heavy duty cable is 2 big to connect in serial mode, i.e mains -> Cooker-> Hob ->cooker-> mains

    Sad to admit i have an honours degree in electrial engineering, should of went to a few more lectures,(not working in the field either)

    Leaning towards getting a sparks in now, anyone know how much?

    thanks
    again
     
  9. Hoagy

    Hoagy Frequent Poster

    Posts:
    380
    You are describing a ring circuit here, not applicable in this case.

    It is completely normal for only one cooker circuit to be provided by the builder.
    All you need to do is to loop to the hob from the oven connections using the same size cable, i.e. 6sq T&E (Wiring Rules)
    The oven terminals are plenty big enough to connect two 6sq cables.
    Make sure the connections are good and tight.