Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees?

Discussion in 'Work, Careers, Employment rights, further study' started by polo1, Feb 23, 2009.

  1. polo1

    polo1 Frequent Poster

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    238
    Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees, for example to name a few, reduction in pay, shift premium reduced, no bonus, change to pension from Defined Benefit to Defined Contribution, No sick pay etc.

    They have requested that employees re apply for their positions under these new terms. If you dont accept you can get redundancy, but I was just wondering if you are have any comeback in relation to this. Are you entitled to anything if you apply and get one of these "new" positions?

    Thanks
     
  2. shesells

    shesells Frequent Poster

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    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Companies can only make unliateral changes if it's a response to a change in the law. Otherwise it must be mutually agreed.

    Applying for your job under these conditions suggests acceptance of these. Why would you just accept them if you already have a contract with better terms?
     
  3. polo1

    polo1 Frequent Poster

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    238
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Basically the company are giving emplpyees no option but to accept these terms. Its a well know Irish company. If you dont accept you take redundancy and you no longer have a job?. So I guess its either grin and bear it...
     
  4. Stifster

    Stifster Frequent Poster

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    672
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    It is grin and bear it. Particularly if they can show that redundancies would be legitimate if the new terms weren't accepted.
     
  5. shesells

    shesells Frequent Poster

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    2,222
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Have a look on www.employmentrights.ie and maybe give them a call, they are very helpful!
     
  6. Cligereen

    Cligereen Frequent Poster

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    54
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Or work in the public sector, where exactly this scenario is playing out.
     
  7. crumdub12

    crumdub12 Frequent Poster

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    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Polo,

    Are they giving you mandatory redundancy ??? without full information of case, I believe they cannot force you to move contract or take voluntary redundancy.

    I would check this situation out with
    http://www.flac.ie

    Industrial lawyer in Meath St, Dublin on wednesday, you must book though.

    If you have update, post it back for future reference
     
  8. FutureProof

    FutureProof Frequent Poster

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    101
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    alot of companies are taking advantage of the climate to do this. Its because they know people would rather take a pay cut than be jobless
     
  9. rootuid

    rootuid New Member

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    3
    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Sorry I'm not clear about the answer. Can a company change benefits as outlined as they wish?
     
  10. doomandgloom

    doomandgloom Guest

    Re: Can a company just unilaterally change working terms and conditions for employees

    Company cannot change terms and conditions without consent/ mutual agreement of employees.
    They can propose changes and if employees do not reject the proposal(s) it can be deemed as consent.
    In the current climate, many companies are changing conditions in this way. Employees are perfectly entitled to refuse the changes. If this means redundancies will result, the company then have to go through the process of fair selection for redundancy etc.